Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


powered by Surfing Waves




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2019
     
    What ho one and all,

    When I built, we installed GU10 halogen for the downlights. They were subsequently replaced with GU10 LED lamps.

    The ones I choose have 20 SMD and are 5W output. One has gone so am researching for a replacement. Can find many 5W but the number of SMDs ranges from 10 to 80.

    What are the pros / cons of a 5W with 80 SMDs over my current 5W / 20 MD?

    Thanks, toodle pip and Merry Christmas.

    rex
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2019
     
    Can't answer the question directly, but when we built I bought samples of a whole load of LED GU10 lamps, having decided to use GU10 fittings in most places and my clear favourite at the time were Crompton 5 W COB based on their uniform output over the lit area. Many others had a mixture of yellow and blue arcs within their output. We chose LGU105DLCOB. I'm currently looking for some LGU105CWCOB to get a slightly warmer colour in some areas, despite the name.
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2019 edited
     
    Like djh, I used COB (Chip On Board) LEDs on my last project, rather than SMDs (Surface Mounted Devices). COBs integrate the LEDs and the substrate, leading to better thermal performance and greater energy efficiency (more lumens / Watt) - so a good choice if you want single colour lighting.
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2020
     
    I replied to another thread with my answer but now have 3000k, 6w, 500 lm, with a 120 degree angle. I believe they are COB and overall, very happy.

    Much nicer than the previous SMD and less shadow areas in the kitchen
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2020
     
    +1

    I generally look for wide angle (>90 degrees), over 400 Lumens, and warm white.

    It may also be worth checking the dimensions as not all GU10 downlights bulbs are exactly the same size.
    • CommentAuthorSteveZ
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2020
     
    LED lamps latest

    I have recently replaced three 50W GU10 lamps and four 35W GU10 with 5W 3000K LED lamps labelled ALUX. Nice looking lamps, plastic cases and frosted fronts. They are however 'too bright' and I have replaced them all with a dimmable unmarked version of 3W and 3000K! These are 120° spread and rated 350 - 400 Lumens. The 3W replacements give a more acceptable light because the 5W do put out a lot of light (400 - 450 Lumen), although I bought them as a 50W replacement. The 5W can go in the utility room, where a bit of brightness won't be a problem. The individual lamps cost around the £1.20 - £1.40 area, which is pretty reasonable in my opinion.

    I also replaced the 5' 58W fluorescent tube in the kitchen (no recessed lights for us!) with a 22W LED lamp trade name Lumi life, costing around £9. Direct replacement with a straight-through starter included. So far I'm very impressed, no hesitation when switched on - annoying in this cold weather with a normal fluorescent lamp.

    My Screwfix own brand Bayonet Cap 10W warm white LED lamps are still going strong and give a pleasant light - no failures so far.

    I'm now looking at replacing our several remaining SES CFL lamps - you know, the ones that take out the house electrics when they go! What is that about?
Add your comments

    Username Password
  • Format comments as
 
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press