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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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    • CommentAuthormalakoffee
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2019
     
    The photo shows the big bay window on the north-east side of the house. The total span of the bay is about 5.5 metres. The height of the glazing is 1.5 metres.

    The existing double glazing was fitted in 2002 approx. The closest room is used as a bedroom. the furthest room is a guest bedroom = storage.

    Current challenges :-
    These bay windows are badly affected by condensation during the winter. Fully closing the blinds and curtains makes it worse.
    During the summer I have to keep the blinds and curtains closed to minimise the solar gain. ( Up until around
    midday in mid-summer ).
    I used to like the open feel of this huge bay window, however since the new neighbours have arrived, with their "more active" lifestyle I would be quite happy to close down the panoramic aspect.

    Possible responses :-
    - Do nothing : sell up and move on
    OR
    - Replace the existing window units with triple-glazed units
    OR
    - Replan the glazed areas and infill the rest with highly insulated walls. ? How to estimate an acceptable amount of light i.e. How big/small the new windows ?

    Additional :-
    Either side of the bay windows the corners are cold corners. The internal wall surfaces are prone to ( mild ) mould growth.

    Any thoughts or guidance would be appreciated.
      200101BayWindow480.JPG
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2019
     
    In no particular order:

    "Replacing with 3G" might not be too compatible with "close down the panoramic aspect".
    To estimate an acceptable amount of light i.e. How big/small the new windows ?

    Perhaps try some external screening first, using planters with bamboos or other tallish plants.

    For overheating in summer, perhaps some brises-soleil or even a standalone gazebo-like structure (planted in the garden) to take either creeper plants or decorative infill (screens).

    I presume your "outward-bound neighbours" are opposite ? If so, perhaps a hedge to give you some privacy. If their "more active" lifestyle involves fixing cars on the street, maybe contact your local council...

    Good luck, as they say, "act in haste, repent at leisure" :devil:

    gg
  1.  
    Posted By: malakoffeeI used to like the open feel of this huge bay window, however since the new neighbours have arrived, with their "more active" lifestyle I would be quite happy to close down the panoramic aspect.

    Possible responses :-
    - Do nothing : sell up and move on
    OR
    - Replace the existing window units with triple-glazed units
    OR
    - Replan the glazed areas and infill the rest with highly insulated walls. ? How to estimate an acceptable amount of light i.e. How big/small the new windows ?

    Additional :-
    Either side of the bay windows the corners are cold corners. The internal wall surfaces are prone to ( mild ) mould growth.

    Any thoughts or guidance would be appreciated.


    Have the new neighbours caused you to think about moving house other than for the reasons mentioned. If not it's quite drastic to move house for the sake of altering the windows.
    Are the walls insulated, if not, is that causing the mould or are the curtains preventing ventilation and is that causing mould to form.
    I don't think triple glazing is going to help at all.
    If your 'active' neighbours are on your left and can see into the room through the corner of the bay you could replace the angled area of glazing with insulated wall which wouldn't greatly decrease the amount of light entering the rooms.
    • CommentAuthormalakoffee
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2019 edited
     
    Thanks for the screening plant(s) suggestion. That is certainly an incremental, low-risk, reversible response to changing circumstances.
    I've decided => 6metres of privet along the side & 6 metres of green beech along the frontage.

    Meanwhile, my primary focus is :- how to improve the thermal performance of the cold-end of the house.

    The change in circumstances opens up the possibility of reducing the glazed area. Obviously best to plan and execute this before going ahead with straight-replacement triple-glazing the existing bay window.

    The existing wall cavities are filled with some sort of paper-fluff insulation ABOVE the damp-proof course. However, the DPCs are level or sightly higher (!) than the internal floor level.

    PS. If I could find a plot I would love to build a super-insulated eco-home to a very similar floorplan to this bungalow.
    • CommentAuthorgyrogear
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2019
     
    Posted By: malakoffeeIf I could find a plot I would love to build a super-insulated eco-home


    wouldn't we all !

    however, for the vast majority, the art of music is in eco-renovation...

    gg
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2019
     
    Posted By: malakoffeeIf I could find a plot I would love to build a super-insulated eco-home

    Have you registered for a plot with your local council and what are they offering?
    • CommentAuthorGreenPaddy
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2019
     
    A few thoughts, that may/may not be helpful...

    Re. altering the glazed exterior, is the bay an original? It looks like it might have been increased in area at some point (esp. as wall internal room divider wall depth captured in window mullion).

    If it has been altered, are there any other same/similar houses locally, that still show the original design? Perhaps you could take it back to the original if that's the case (visually) but employ current insulation/construction techniques to reduce the heat loss??
  2.  
    Malakoffee
    Looking at the photo - it might be difficult to remove or block up the small angled window as this seems to be the only opening light. As a guide to window size look at the regs. I have a feeling that you may have more window than required (is there now a max. recommended of 25% of floor area??) I remember a figure of 20% of floor area with at least half of that opening, which could mean that you do not have enough opening lights to comply (if that matters to you) but I may be wrong about the numbers as I have been out of the UK for some time.
    • CommentAuthorriboid
    • CommentTimeJan 2nd 2020
     
    I have a bay window type and just about to do the same thing - I have strapped out all of the walls and about to insulate with PIR slabs 125mm thick. I will tape all the seams together to provide a vapour control layer (ensure you rub the tape down) but, for belt and braces, I will apply an air tightness membrane and then I will plasterboard over the entire area. That will all be plastered to further enhance the air tightness. You could maybe look at running a dehumidifier (I am) to draw out some of the moisture prior to insulating as you don't want to be locking any moisture in there (interstitial condensation). Incidentally, my rooms are down to bare brick wall. So, when I install my new very low u value triple glazing, I will be sealing them in with air tightness membranes and tapes.
  3.  
    The existing bay windows, as shown, are very much the original layout. Several of the identical bungalows have the glazed area reduced by means of a centrally-placed, solid wall ( between the front rooms ). I would guess for increased privacy rather than temperature-control / insulation.
    No others have blocked in the sides of the bay.

    Floor to wall ratio :-
    Currently . . . .
    Larger room 38% of window to floor area.
    Smaller room 32%

    If I went ahead with reducing the glazed area the new 3G units could be specified with appropriately compliant openings.

    Things to check :-
    Planning Permission required ? Suburban area within a National Park.

    Can I get decent 3G with decent frame insulation ( I'm not impressed with my recent 2G unit frames where condensation forms on the frames ( as well as the glass ))
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 2nd 2020
     
    Not your area, I think but may be helpful:

    https://www.newforestnpa.gov.uk/planning/frequently-asked-questions/guide-types-alterations/

    Yes, you can get windows with excellent frame insulation - PH or better standard - but they do cost more money!

    Your window area does look to be high, especially with a NE aspect.
  4.  
    Posted By: malakoffeeCan I get decent 3G with decent frame insulation ( I'm not impressed with my recent 2G unit frames where condensation forms on the frames ( as well as the glass ))


    IMHO there isn't much point in having 3G without insulated frames. We have Rehau Geneo insulated frames with 3G that meet PH standards.
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