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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2020
     
    Im looking to install 5 m2 of electric UFH in a tiled wetroom to keep the floor temperature pleasant without having to fire the CH and heat the whole of the upstairs.There will be 20mm insulated Jackoboard under the UFH.

    Anyone got any recomendations on good systems or any to avoid??
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2020
     
    When I laid stone tiles in my hallway and kitchen a couple of years ago I laid loose cable UFH, and I'd use that again as opposed to the ready made mats. It gives greater flexibility in awkward shaped areas. If you go down that route use twin conductor heating cable, then you don't have to bring the tail end back to the beginning to complete an electrical circuit.
    I laid the cable onto Dukkaboard insulation board and then levelling screeded over the top before tiling in the usual manner with a notched trowel. The levelling screed prevents any possible accidents with the tiling trowel nicking the cable.

    Both systems work fine although we rarely use them. We currently use wet radiators in both areas. I installed them because it was a cheap future proofing job when our biomass boiler breathes it's last. I then have the option of going all electric in those areas, plus being resistive heating I can link it to my solar PV production via a power diverter.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2020
     
    Posted By: philedgeAnyone got any recomendations on good systems or any to avoid??

    Replace the tiles with vinyl, linoleum and/or bamboo and then you won't need to heat it.
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2020 edited
     
  1.  
    We laid vinyl on woodfibre insulation board, but an unseen leak under the cistern allowed water to wick right the way under the vinyl across the room. Everything was totally minging when we found out and lifted it all. We replaced it using inorganic insulation (marmox) with tiles bonded down on it, to eliminate wicking routes, and will never use vinyl in bathrooms again.

    We used Devi mat, worked very nicely, easy and familiar for the tiler to lay. (Edit: it was embedded in self leveling compound, then tiled over, same as owlman described). If the insulation is good then it takes minimal electricity to raise the tiles by a few degrees to luxurious temperature at bathtimes, and water drips on the floor evaporate quickly.

    Only regret was we didn't take the mat close enough to the edge of room, leaving a cold border that bare feet would inevitably find...!
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2020
     
    It is a wet room.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2020
     
    Posted By: Mike1Or cork

    Indeed.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2020
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenWe laid vinyl on woodfibre insulation board, but an unseen leak under the cistern allowed water to wick right the way under the vinyl across the room. Everything was totally minging when we found out and lifted it all. We replaced it using inorganic insulation (marmox) with tiles bonded down on it, to eliminate wicking routes, and will never use vinyl in bathrooms again.

    I don't quite understand the description. Vinyl directly on woodfibre? What provides the rigidity? Cistern, what cistern? Why is a leaking cistern the problem of the floor construction? Especially of the surface layer?

    I do not understand the contribution of the vinyl to this story at all? Why are tiles better?
  2.  
    Because
    tiles eliminate wicking routes


    So will not allow
    water to wick right the way under the vinyl across the room.


    If you're interested in the specialist woodfibre insulation that is intended for use under roll vinyl, with a surface similar to hardboard, being pretty much the only insulation board that is (was?) available for use directly under roll vinyl, then Google will be your friend, but I sincerely don't recommend it in bathrooms, no matter how well you think the vinyl edge are sealed to the wall.
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
    Thanks for replies so far.

    A tiled floor is a done deal with UFH pretty much essential to avoid a sad face each winter morning. As well as warming the floor the UFH is to take the chill off the bathroom so pretty much essential even if moving to a covering other than tiles.

    Was hoping to identify and lemon cabling/controller systems that needed avoiding. Anyone used the Klima matting that Screwfix sell?
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
    Cork mat to stand on
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenBecause
    tiles eliminate wicking routes

    No, it's not the tiles that eliminate the wicking route, it's the gluing down. Our wetroom has a proper contract-vinyl floor (as used in hospitals) glued down and wrapped up the walls. Installed by a contract floor fitter. Not that we have a cistern where it can flood under the vinyl anyway. But water falling on the floor stays on top of the floor until it reaches the drain. Water falling alongside the floor will drain down onto the concrete slab, not sideways under the vinyl floor, I believe.

    The woodfibre insulation board that you mentioned was actually underlay, no? And it specifically says: "Not recommended for use on underfloor heating", so not really relevant here. Or is there more than one prduct that shows up on google :devil:
  3.  
    Haha, no, try again! It was a thick
    specialist woodfibre insulation board


    Not sure why you'd ever put insulation board over ufh? The point of using vinyl over insulation is to give a comfortable surface (isolated from the concrete which feels colder underfoot) _without_ using ufh. But
    I sincerely don't recommend it in bathrooms
    Our contract floor fitter was very confident how well he had sealed it... wishing you better luck with yours.

    The OP is looking for experience with tiles over electric ufh over insulation, our experience was much more positive than with the vinyl.:bigsmile:
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