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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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  1.  
    Director of Limited Company
    Time to replace my personal vehicle (2.5 petrol)

    I understand the BIK on 100% EV's is 0% from April... So what's the best options given the change?

    Random thoughts:

    1. Purchasing an EV outright as fixed asset reduces profits so saving on corporation tax of 19% of value of vehicle. Essentially reducing price of vehicle compared to bought privately

    2. No BIK taxes, no NI payments for 2020, small increase in 2021 and 2022

    3. No option to claim back 45p per mile as what I currently do

    4. The vehicle insurance would be deemed a business expense

    5. Current annual mileage is ~£10,000 so £4500 reclaimed

    I can't do the maths as there's other variables such as depreciation etc.

    Are EV's really worth buying on a company or perhaps just get a personal lease and reclaim the mileage....

    Or just run a more modern petrol? So many considerations....

    I'm sure someone will say ask the accountant but it's a pretty new process and I guess you need to look at it overall. My accountant doesn't know much about cars either...

    What are the thoughts or best to ask in a business forum?
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2020
     
    No question about it, shut your eyes and get a Tesla
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2020
     
    Posted By: Victorianeco

    I'm sure someone will say ask the accountant but it's a pretty new process and I guess you need to look at it overall. My accountant doesn't know much about cars either...


    If you think GBF will know more than your accountant, then you probably need a new accountant!
    •  
      CommentAuthornigel
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2020
     
    Well I bought my Tesla in my company, I don't do many business miles though so it was an easy decision.

    How many of your miles are to and from work, you cannot claim for these.

    Essentially you will have a tax free car for personal use and all expenses covered by the company plus you can claim 4p per mile for electric mileage.

    Unless the total cost of buying and running the car is less than £4100 (£4500 less £400) per annum then I would say its definitely cheaper in the company plus you get cashflow advantage of capital allowances.
  2.  
    Not sure how you've calculated that...

    But is it better to buy or lease and maybe even treat as a pool car perhaps?

    Loads of didn't options I guess
  3.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: philedge</cite><blockquote><cite>Posted By: Victorianeco</cite>

    I'm sure someone will say ask the accountant but it's a pretty new process and I guess you need to look at it overall. My accountant doesn't know much about cars either...</blockquote>

    If you think GBF will know more than your accountant, then you probably need a new accountant!</blockquote>

    Not quite sure that's the case. An accountant can look at it from a pure tax perspective. A consumer like myself looks at things overall such as tax, residual values, green benefit, performance of vehicle etc etc.

    It's often not as clear as things are made out
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2020
     
    Have you tried out a Tesla yet?
    •  
      CommentAuthornigel
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2020
     
    If you buy in company you can claim the VAT back if its a genuine pool car.

    If it is a pool car you are not allowed ANY private use, so it is difficult to justify especially if its a premium car.

    The buy or lease choice depends on your attitude to risk, the lease fixes the cost whereas purchase exposes you to risk in the final resale value, costs wise there is often not much in it where the expected final value is accurate.
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2020
     
    Posted By: Victorianeco

    Not quite sure that's the case. An accountant can look at it from a pure tax perspective. A consumer like myself looks at things overall such as tax, residual values, green benefit, performance of vehicle etc etc.


    Thats totally correct........but everything in your original post related to tax and financial benefit which your accountant should be advising you on as they know your circumstances/goals.
  4.  
    'my accountant didn't know much about cars' was probably the key point in my post

    Maybe a tesla despite a higher cost may have better residuals than a nissan leaf and actually be a better choice.

    Reason I was asking in a green forum as opposed to one person's (the accountant) input
  5.  
    Posted By: VictorianecoMaybe a tesla despite a higher cost may have better residuals than a nissan leaf and actually be a better choice.

    Although from a green perspective you shouldn't just be considering financial residuals.

    IMO Tesla's are overlarge, overpowered and heavy on resources. If you're being 'green' don't buy a vehicle bigger than you need (and don't justify a big vehicle that your'e only going to fill once a year - pretty sure Renault have some sort of loan deal so that you can borrow a different car when you do need it).
    • CommentAuthorbhommels
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: Simon Still
    IMO Tesla's are overlarge, overpowered and heavy on resources.

    Agree. On the other hand if it wasn't for Tesla there would hardly be any take-up of EVs.
  6.  
    Posted By: Simon Still overlarge, overpowered and heavy on resources. If you're being 'green' don't buy a vehicle bigger than you need (and don't justify a big vehicle that your'e only going to fill once a year).


    Errrrrrrr - hello Simon - weren't you just recently advising VE that you use a delivery van as your family car, because you can put your bike in the back instead of putting it on the roof?? http://www.greenbuildingforum.co.uk/newforum/comments.php?DiscussionID=16383


    Hello VE, did you find somewhere to charge your EV in the end, it was looking difficult to get plugged in where you are? Would a hybrid be worth considering if you don't have daily access to a charging space?
    • CommentAuthorSimon Still
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenweren't you just recently advising VE that you use a delivery van as your family car, because you can put your bike in the back instead of putting it on the roof??


    Absolutely - yes, we have expensive bikes and putting them on the roof in car parks/campsites/service stations isn't an option. It's the right tool for the job for us as it very rarely gets used without 2 people, 2 bikes and luggage. When it doesn't have bikes in it's usually transporting furniture for my wife's restoration business. We live in a city and use bikes as our default transport mode (I commute by bike, K does quotes and site jobs with a bike and trailer and has workshop at home).

    The Caddy Maxi is both shorter and over 40cm narrower than a Tesla Model S.

    It's about the right tool for the job. If you need to carry bulky materials get a small van (a lot or people buy a Transporter when a Caddy would do) not a huge 4x4 pickup. If you want to carry one person and a tool box you don't need anything bigger than a Smart Car.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2020
     
    Posted By: Simon StillIf you need to carry bulky materials get a small van

    With the caveat that if some of the bulk materials are 8x4 sheets, make sure the load area of the van is big enough! :bigsmile:
  7.  
    Posted By: djh
    Posted By: Simon StillIf you need to carry bulky materials get a small van

    With the caveat that if some of the bulk materials are 8x4 sheets, make sure the load area of the van is big enough!http:///newforum/extensions/Vanillacons/smilies/standard/bigsmile.gif" alt=":bigsmile:" title=":bigsmile:" >


    or look at how often you actually need to transport uncut 8x4 sheets and if it makes more sense to get them delivered than to run a larger vehicle.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2020
     
    Indeed but in that case you don't need to carry bulky materials which are 8 x 4 sheets. If you do, then the van needs to be big enough.

    It may seem an obvious point, but one of the carpenters who helped build my house, who thought of himself as more of a joiner, bought himself a smaller van. That meant we always had to use his colleague's van to collect materials and that was fine but proved awkward enough on other jobs that he rapidly bought himself another bigger van. Lots of hassle and some expense when a little more thought at the outset would have avoided it. That's all I'm saying.
  8.  
    8 x 4 sheets and indeed ladders will go on a roof rack although plaster board is generally better inside and although trailers can be a bit unwieldy and depending upon the area can have parking issues they can provide a useful solution for occasional big items.
  9.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: WillInAberdeen</cite><blockquote><cite>Posted By: Simon Still</cite>overlarge, overpowered and heavy on resources. If you're being 'green' don't buy a vehicle bigger than you need (and don't justify a big vehicle that your'e only going to fill once a year).</blockquote>

    Errrrrrrr - hello Simon - weren't you just recently advising VE that you use a delivery van as your family car, because you can put your bike in the back instead of putting it on the roof?? http://www.greenbuildingforum.co.uk/newforum/comments.php?DiscussionID=16383


    Hello VE, did you find somewhere to charge your EV in the end, it was looking difficult to get plugged in where you are? Would a hybrid be worth considering if you don't have daily access to a charging space?</blockquote>

    Both my parents have a driveway so I have no issue leaving the car overnight and walking the dog home if it is once or twice a week and maybe plan routes more strategically.

    We could probably swap cars with either of our parents too if we were stuck for charge, but I think strategically the longest distance I do on a day to day basis is 150 miles tops and that's rare
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