Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


powered by Surfing Waves




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2020
     
    Good day all

    I’ve bought an old barn/oast, its been neglected for far too long, i’ve dealt with the majority of the leaks and ineffective gutters etc. and its now pretty weather tight, there are areas of rotten and sodden timberwork that will now hopefully start to dry out.
    As they do so, i’d like to prevent any further rot / mould taking hold or woodworm making further advances. Any recommended products to help look after things?
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2020 edited
     
    Keep the wood dry and woodworm can’t digest it

    Keep wood dry and it won’t rot either

    Cut out any rot and replace it with new or s/h dry wood
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2020
     
    Dry is variable depending on where you are in the country. In my parent's house which has little heating but perfectly watertight, there is a desk being decimated by woodworm (I really need to sort it)

    Baratine makes a pretty good clear wood preserver that I have used on many things over the years. An entomologist friend said the key ingredient for dealing with live woodworm is permethrin so look for this in the ingredients.
    • CommentAuthorjfb
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2020
     
  1.  
    Borax
    I think it’s called Pro-Bor availabile online.
    • CommentAuthorCliff Pope
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2020
     
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: Beau</cite>Dry is variable depending on where you are in the country. In my parent's house which has little heating but perfectly watertight, there is a desk being decimated by woodworm </blockquote>

    It's often struck me that woodworm seem to pick on particular wooden items. They love tool handles - not damp ones lying forgotten on the floor in a corner of a damp workshop, but well cared for items hanging on hooks with plenty of ventilation.
    If they like damp wood so much why aren't they a problem eating fence posts?
    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2020
     
    Cheers gents.

    The barn timbers in part are upto 250 years old , modified over the years and a mix of rough hewn oak and softwood.
    Some of the oak has lost all its sapwood leaving the iron hard heartwood. The older softwood is riddled but not active where its dry, the problematic areas are those that have been wet for some time which have very active worm, very localised and hopefully self limiting as it dries out, its been leaking for so long in some areas that a main purling 9” x 6” has rotted away completely.
    Looking to prevent mould and rot as the wet areas dry out, then assess how much needs replacing/ repairing. I’ll look up the products recommended, all appreciated.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2020
     
    Posted By: Cliff PopeIt's often struck me that woodworm seem to pick on particular wooden items. They love tool handles

    Woodworm and other creatures much prefer particular species and avoid others, in my limited experience. Ash is a particular favourite and often seen in tool handles. Ash is also susceptible to ash bark beetle, which produces similar symptoms. But I've never had a problem with tool handles being attacked myself.

    If they like damp wood so much why aren't they a problem eating fence posts?

    Fence posts are usually treated, no? (the sawn ones). Or made from resistant species. (in-the-round ones)
  2.  
    Hi Artiglio, AIUI the really strong insecticides are restricted sale to the public and only available to specialist companies, you can get someone to come and spray them but can't do it yourself. They'll give you a certificate, which you will need if you ever need a mortgage (or sell the property). Maybe worth considering this before covering over timbers with insulation and finishes? (Edit - there seems some strong stuff on eBay, though you're supposed to dilute it before use)

    Having said that, I'm treating odd patches in floorboards with the strongest stuff I found at the DIY store, which contains treatment for rot as well as worms.
    • CommentAuthorGreenPaddy
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2020
     
    try this -

    www.platinumchemicals.co.uk/collections/woodworm-treatment/products/lignum-pro-woodworm-treatment

    Being a GREEN forum, probably should be trying something less toxic, but this is what I get my clients to use. The hard bit is getting access ad sight of all the hidden bits, and really cleaning everything, to get rid of dust, webs, and frass (wee bits the beetles push out as they bore to exit).
    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2020
     
    Evening Green Paddy , it just so happens your recomendation and comments are exactly the same as those i’ve received elsewhere. It looks as though i have a long job with a hoover and brush before i start treating.

    Many thanks.
Add your comments

    Username Password
  • Format comments as
 
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press