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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
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  1.  
    I know a Specialized Sirrus was a recommended all round bike on here before. I ended up buying a Tricross in the end and put 28mm Schwalbe tyres on.

    Has done the trick but I quite fancy an ebike now. What's a good all round second hand bike to look out for?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2020
     
    Orbea Gain, if you're moderately fit i.e. don't just want to moped-it.
  2.  
    Hi VE, During your recent workings with your tax accountant, have you looked at the Cycle to Work scheme?

    https://www.clearskyaccounting.co.uk/help-me-decide/faqs/cycle-to-work-scheme/
  3.  
    Yeah, I've seen that but in all honesty I think I'd still rather a second hand one at a bargain or maybe build my own as a project with my son
  4.  
    Which e-bike is like 'which car'. What do you actually want to do with it?

    Is it for long rides on road? Doing the shopping? Riding on bridleways?

    https://ebiketips.road.cc/reviews is a good site for reviews.
    • CommentAuthorSteveZ
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2020
     
    I have an old Raleigh city bike which I fitted out with a crank drive motor and battery mounted on the rear carrier. It still has the rear gears and it is brilliant. The power from the 250W motor coupled with the gears make riding it a real pleasure, so much so that my nice Boardman is left hanging up in the garage. Nipping down to our local shop takes a few minutes and is almost as quick as the car and a lot more enjoyable. If anyone wants more details of the motor and battery and where to buy them, just ask.
  5.  
    I'd be interested please
    • CommentAuthorSteveZ
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2020
     
    The battery came from eBay and the crank drive motor came via Alibaba. Here are the details

    Tongsheng Mid-drive motor:
    Huzhou Hengtuo Imp. and Exp. Co., Ltd.
    Han Erick
    Germany Stock 36V 250W Ebike kit Tongsheng TSDZ2 Mid Drive Motor with VLCD5 display
    Color:Black
    Good service from German stockist. The Tongsheng seemed better than the similar Bafang, and I am very happy with it

    Battery:
    36volt 15Ah Li-ion bike battery and carrier. A 10Ah is smaller cheaper and lighter and will suit most commuters.This will have to be chosen to suit your bike and the battery location. If it will go on the downtube, so much the better for wiring and weight distribution. Mine had to go on the rear carrier, so the weight is high up and not ideal. Batteries are available on Alibaba and eBay, I chose eBay because they had the one I wanted.

    The only real problem I had with the conversion was getting the 30 year-old plastic cup bottom bracket set out of the Raleigh! The total cost was around £450 as I already had the bike.
  6.  
    Do you find 250w is sufficient? I fancy maybe a 1000w motor...
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020
     
    Over 250w and its a motor bike needing licence, ins, mot etc etc.
  7.  
    eBikes can only give assistance when you are pedalling and all assistance should cut out above 15mph. There are various other rules like motor size mentioned above to stop it being classified as a bike.

    In London I spot quite a few "illegal" eBikes that really should be classified as motorbikes.
  8.  
    That's fine for me, I'm sure we all break rules at some point

    What was the German supplier please?

    And is it literally the motor kit and a battery nothing else required?
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoThat's fine for me, I'm sure we all break rules at some point

    Apparently, and for good reason, France is introducing some quite draconian laws against non compliant ebikes. Hopefully we'll be not to far behind in addressing this issue as the growing use of high speed bikes on footpaths and cycleways is crazy.
    • CommentAuthorSimon Still
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoThat's fine for me, I'm sure we all break rules at some point


    *really?*

    If you're riding this only on your own land then fill your boots, but if you're riding it on public rights of way or on the road this is an illegal, unlicensed, uninsured vehicle. If you get caught riding it you'll be charged with driving while uninsured and driving without a licence (and will likely lose your driving licence). If you hit someone while riding it you've got no third party insurance so you'll be personally liable.

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/thomas-hanlon-ebike-sakine-cihan-dalston-crash-a4376446.html

    Plus, purely from a personal safety point of view, you're modifying a bike that was built strong enough to take a human power input. A Tour de France pro might average 4-500w over a reasonable period, and peak higher, but 1000w into a standard bike is going to put a massive amount of stress through it.
  9.  
    Okay so if one stuck to a 250w mid drive motor and the tricross has 3 chain rings, what happens to those 3?

    Does it just drop to one cog?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020
     
    There are lots of forums about building your own e-bike that will likely give you more and better advice. I don't know which are the best.
    • CommentAuthordereke
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020
     
    The motors legally can only be 250W nominal. I believe that means that they can peak higher - as high as 750W.

    I've got a Tern GSD (it is absolutely fantastic) 250W motor and I ride up hills with two kids (5 and 7) with ease. Newer models have more torque which I think would be more beneficial to me than raw power.

    I'm keeping mine limited to 15mph but I must admit I've been tempted to break the limiter to make it safer "sharing" the road with drivers. I've had so many close calls with drivers overtaking dangerously I think it could be safer to ride illegally. The best option of course would be more and better cycling infrastructure.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: Simon StillA Tour de France pro might average 4-500w over a reasonable period, and peak higher
    Really? As mechanical power? I've always understood 'an Olympic cyclist' would do 120W for a few minutes. A carthorse only produces 750W sustained (1 horsepower). Of course in the process the body produces a lot more power than that, largely dissipated as heat, but the mechanical %age is quite small (Carnot and all that) http://large.stanford.edu/courses/2014/ph240/labonta1/
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: fostertomReally? As mechanical power? I've always understood 'an Olympic cyclist' would do 120W for a few minutes.


    Not to diminish the Simon's safety points (which I 100% agree with) a decent cyclist will do well over 1000W.

    Track bikes have extra sturdy drivetrains as snapping bits when sprinting can result in serious injury.

    https://www.uci.org/news/2019/track-sprinting-a-question-of-watts
    'Chris Hoy would blast out 2500 watts as he raced round the velodrome'
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2020
     
    Posted By: fostertomI've always understood 'an Olympic cyclist' would do 120W for a few minutes.

    I'd expect a fit person like an Olympic athlete to burn more than 120 W at rest!
  10.  
    Rule of thumb is about 100W per sedentary adult and, according to Brenda and Robert Vale, 25W per cat. Brightened up many a training session, has that bit of knowledge!
  11.  
    Err.. FT was quite clear he meant Watts of
    mechanical power
    , and they would be much fewer than the Watts burned, most of which turn into heat or evaporation.

    A sedentary cat produces zero Watts of mechanical power, especially while it is riding a bike!
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2020
     
    I don't think anybody's disagreeing about what Tom meant.
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenErr.. FT was quite clear he meant Watts of
    mechanical power
    , and they would be much fewer than the Watts burned, most of which turn into heat or evaporation.

    A sedentary cat produces zero Watts of mechanical power, especially while it is riding a bike!


    and a decent cyclist will produce over 1000W of mechanical power as per the link posted above rather than 120W.
    • CommentAuthorBeau
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2020
     
    I got a Focus Jam2 HT 2019. A full-on mountain bike but its got eyelets for attaching a pannier so it gets used for everything from blasting over the trails of Dartmoor to a shopping run. Way more power than I ever need and lives set on eco setting most of the time. The 2019 models came with one smallish built in battery and second detachable one for when you want to do long runs. I get 25miles out of the built-in battery on my Dartmoor trails and far more when visiting the inlaws in New Forest due to lack of hills. Rarely use the additional pack. It's way OTT for shopping but it does the job fine and gives you loads of other fun riding options. I went from a total cynic to a complete convert in two rides.
  12.  
    Posted By: jms452
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenErr.. FT was quite clear he meant Watts of
    mechanical power
    , and they would be much fewer than the Watts burned, most of which turn into heat or evaporation.

    A sedentary cat produces zero Watts of mechanical power, especially while it is riding a bike!


    and a decent cyclist will produce over 1000W of mechanical power as per the link posted above rather than 120W.


    I was working from. https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/tour-de-france-2019-individual-time-trial-analysis/
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2020
     
    Wow! I'm convinced. I will now use
    Posted By: Simon StillA Tour de France pro might average 4-500w over a reasonable period
    as my standard factoid. Thanks.
  13.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: dereke</cite>The motors legally can only be 250W nominal. I believe that means that they can peak higher - as high as 750W.

    I've got a Tern GSD (it is absolutely fantastic) 250W motor and I ride up hills with two kids (5 and 7) with ease. Newer models have more torque which I think would be more beneficial to me than raw power.

    I'm keeping mine limited to 15mph but I must admit I've been tempted to break the limiter to make it safer "sharing" the road with drivers. I've had so many close calls with drivers overtaking dangerously I think it could be safer to ride illegally. The best option of course would be more and better cycling infrastructure.</blockquote>

    So a 250w Tongshen could in fact be the same as a 750w just labelled differently perhaps?
  14.  
    Posted By: VictorianecoSo a 250w Tongshen could in fact be the same as a 750w just labelled differently perhaps?


    no.

    https://ebikechoices.com/tongsheng-tsdz2-review/

    "In this post I will be reviewing the 250w version – this is the only variant I can recommend for road legal use in the UK, Europe and Australia."
    • CommentAuthordereke
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2020
     
    Posted By: Simon Still
    Posted By: VictorianecoSo a 250w Tongshen could in fact be the same as a 750w just labelled differently perhaps?


    no.

    https://ebikechoices.com/tongsheng-tsdz2-review/

    "In this post I will be reviewing the 250w version – this is the only variant I can recommend for road legal use in the UK, Europe and Australia."


    Just to clarify - no, but also possibly yes :wink:.

    I think this article does a pretty good job of explaining why.

    http://www.ebikeschool.com/myth-ebike-wattage/
   
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