Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


powered by Surfing Waves




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2020
     
    There are some jobs that are just satisfying and yesterday was prime example.

    Having use most of our 6000 litre rain water for flush the toilets, I put a small pump in the tank and used the pressure washer to flush out all the crud that has accumulated. It was so satisfying to see the water from the hose start dirty and gradually become almost clear.

    I then moved to the loft tank and as suggested on this forum some time ago, I syphoned the water away to also remove the settled crud. Was surprised that only took around ten minutes.

    Now I await the rain while looking for the next domestic job.

    Toodle pip and stay safe
    • CommentAuthorCliff Pope
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2020
     
    The trouble here is that our rainwater storage tanks become increasingly vital as the summer progresses and the well begins to drop. We certainly can't afford to throw away vital stored water now it's looking likely to be needed.

    In the Autumn when it's tipping with rain or the Winter when it's freezing no one feels like going out to clean water tanks. :)
    • CommentAuthorvord
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2020 edited
     
    I wonder if I can post an image on here. I exposed the most wonderful 1920s ceiling this week. It's really helpful as it dictates a direction for the rest of the restoration.

    http://www.the-salutation.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/scaffold-360x450.jpg

    Been making secondary glazing too. This must be the first time ever that secondary glazing has made a window look better!

    http://www.the-salutation.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/secondary-glazing-mouldings-450x338.jpg

    Turns out you can't add images. I've left them as links to pictures you may need to copy into a browser.
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2020 edited
     
    Been there, done that regarding posting images. There is a secret.

    If you are replying to a thread with the 'Add your comments' section at the bottom, then you cannot post images.

    But from the home page or att he top of the thread, you 'Sign in', you can post images.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2020
     
    Impressive pics
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2020 edited
     
    ( What did you do during lock-down? )

    1. On maintaining the domestic harmony side:- re lining and plumbing a new bathroom shower, and also trying to enthuse over slogging my guts out replacing 5 interior doors for new pre-finished and V. heavy ones.

    2. On the personal side learning a new musical instrument.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2020
     
    I've got a £100 3D printer and I'm trying to print visors for NHS. Well that was the plan. First problem was finding an approved design and a way to get them sterilised. That was solved when I discovered this project..

    https://www.rs-online.com/designspark/do-you-have-a-3d-printer-you-can-help-to-fight-covid-19

    So I download the design and my printer dies blowing fuses. One problem after another followed meaning a week later I've printed a dozen of so but not happy with the print quality yet. Trying new filament today - fingers crossed.

    All being well I might manage to print 15-20 a day so in the scheme of things it's a tiny contribution but hopefully there are hundreds of people printing visors all over the country. According to reports in the press some school kids are doing better than me.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020
     
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020
     
    Brilliant made me smile
    • CommentAuthorbhommels
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2020
     
    Finally completed the MVHR install - switched it on today :bigsmile:
    It turned out to be a much bigger job than I thought initially. There are a few small things that still need doing, and a few bigger ones to improve the airtightness further. And I have to get my head around the balancing, but it seems to work. Keen to see what happens to the indoor climate over the next few days!
  1.  
    I've been working on my 'edible garden' project. I've built several raised beds (and filled them with soil) and I'm half way through building a retaining wall that triples the size of a side border that will hold mainly Jerusalem artichokes, french beans and squash. The lock-down has been a pain as I ran out of mortar for the wall, but I finally received my B&Q 'Click and collect' slot and picked some up.
    • CommentAuthordickster
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2020
     
    Clean solar panels.

    After dry weather, had to switch over to mains for loo and washing machine, so retrieved 860 x 2000 mm very old, beautifully made corrugated galvanised cylindrical water tank from brambles.

    Clean and check for leaks. It leaks at bottom via double riveted overlapped seam where it got dinged. Gently prise seam open on inside, drip and poke Galvafroid into it, hammer seam flat whilst still wet.

    This will be our excess above ground rainwater buffer tank, water pumped into tank from old septic tank when too much rain, gravity fed back in when we run out. I'll probably patch leaky area with Aquaseal or some such like, but do other important areas with Galvafroid.

    Mow lawn

    Clean staining on loo seat.

    Get a bit drunk.
  2.  
    Posted By: dicksterGet a bit drunk.

    ...........and put on (a bit?) of weight
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: dickster

    Clean staining on loo seat.

    Get a bit drunk.



    I do hope there's no connection Richard. :wink::bigsmile: Couldn't resist, - sorry.
    • CommentAuthordickster
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2020
     
    No connection.

    We have a loo from new but have replaced seat once already as under the bottom (geddit?) lid, it stained a horrible urine colour. We read the initial instructions that came with it (to find manufacturer/supplier) and found that it was not to be cleaned with bleach. Aha, we thought, a bit of bleach in the loo and the lid down must have been the problem. So new seat gotten, absolutely no bleach, still staining. Reckon it's splashback when we flush. Anyways, have now applied a fake ajax cream that contains no bleach but has a grade 1000 grit type of feel to it. All good now.

    I'm not a great drinker and renowned within our group of friends as a bit of a lightweight, but I know what I like and have a sweet tooth. I used to drink 6 pints of mild a night in my youth, but mild is as rare as rocking horse down in the softy south. You'll find me sipping on a G & T or even a Bailey's now and again. Imagine my horror at age 15 or so to find that snowballs were considered girly and downright effeminate. Damn!

    I do enjoy a S African pinotage every once in a while, but it's the gin that gets me if I stop counting them.

    Weight's coming on very nicely, thank you.
  3.  
    Dickster, agree with you re mild. I started drinking it in the days of CO2-pumped beer when Watneys mild was slightly less horrible than Watneys bitter! When it was available I bought a pint of (bottled) Manns brown ale and a pint of bitter and mixed them 50/50 - much nicer and more 'fruity'. For many years (at least here in Yorks) Manns was almost impossible to get. Then a few years ago one of the local big-chain supermarkets started selling Manns as one of its 'bargain basement' beers. Just over £1 a bottle, beautiful taste and only 2.8% ABV! An hour in the fridge improves it still more.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2020
     
    I've often bemoaned the lack of low ABV but tasty beers and ales.
    As a fairly regular pub goer trying to get something on draught amidst all the 4, 5,and 6+ percent stuff was difficult. Lately however I've noticed the odd low ABV 2.6 session draught ales appearing which is good news, price doesn't seem to alter much though.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2020
     
    Posted By: dicksterWe have a loo from new but have replaced seat once already as under the bottom (geddit?) lid, it stained a horrible urine colour. We read the initial instructions that came with it (to find manufacturer/supplier) and found that it was not to be cleaned with bleach. Aha, we thought, a bit of bleach in the loo and the lid down must have been the problem. So new seat gotten, absolutely no bleach, still staining. Reckon it's splashback when we flush. Anyways, have now applied a fake ajax cream that contains no bleach but has a grade 1000 grit type of feel to it. All good now.

    I can appreciate that problem. SWMBO is a bit of a cleanliness fanatic (for which I give thanks most of the time) and it took her quite a while to convince me that there is spray out the top of a loo when flushed unless the lid is closed, but she has convinced me :confused: We have two different designs of 6/3 flush pans but neither of them reliably flush clean every time. Anybody got any recommendations if I ever replace one? (not that it's likely since she keeps them so clean!)

    I'm not a great drinker and renowned within our group of friends as a bit of a lightweight, but I know what I like and have a sweet tooth.

    Since I now live in Suffolk, I've given the local Aspall's cider a try and quite like it on occasion. Can be drunk in a mug like beer, or in a glass like wine, according to taste.
  4.  
    Posted By: dicksterI used to drink 6 pints of mild a night in my youth, but mild is as rare as rocking horse down in the softy south.


    Posted By: Nick ParsonsDickster, agree with you re mild. I started drinking it in the days of CO2-pumped beer when Watneys mild was slightly less horrible than Watneys bitter!

    My mis-spent youth involved much brown and mild - until mild became like hens teeth in the south-east, that is when I wasn't downing the monastic beers in the south of Belgium.

    Mean while back to the thread subject - todays lock-down job was cutting up a mulberry tree (50cm at the base) that had fallen across one of the farm tracks during a recent storm. next job - decide what can be done with mulberry wood so that I can decide on the planking. (red mulberries if it makes a difference)

    To be honest the lock-down has make very little difference to life on the farm.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2020
     
    Posted By: djh

    Since I now live in Suffolk, I've given the local Aspall's cider a try and quite like it on occasion. Can be drunk in a mug like beer, or in a glass like wine, according to taste.


    I've been using their cider vinegar or years, I'll give their cider a try. I drove past their place last year on my way, for the second time, for a very enjoyable Suffolk holiday.
    • CommentAuthorCliff Pope
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2020
     
    <blockquote>
    Since I now live in Suffolk, I've given the local Aspall's cider a try and quite like it on occasion. Can be drunk in a mug like beer, or in a glass like wine, according to taste.</blockquote>

    I've found the size of the glass has a significant effect on the apparent taste of the contents - mainly psychological I presume.
    Cider in a pint mug encourages one to swig it - fine, but you don't appeciate the subtlety. But sipped from a small wineglass transforms it into nectar, much nicer then champagne.
  5.  
    It's apparently about how the bubbles behave in the glass. A tall cylindrical glass like a champagne flute or a straight pint glass, encourages the bubbles to rise in a column up the centre of the glass, draging liquid up with them, which then returns down the inside edge of the glass. This mixes the drink and gives off certain flavours. In a pint of Guinness you can see the returning liquid dragging micro bubbles 'downwards' in the inside face of the glass. A wider cocktail glass, or a pint mug doesn't do this.

    Many postgrads have applied for funding to study these fluid dynamics further, ideally in pubs in Belgium where every beer has its ideal shape of glass. Sadly, sufficient funding never seems available. The lockdown seems an ideal time for some citizen science experiments on this.

    Edit to add: does anyone drink cider shandy? It was a beautiful thing where I grew up, the cider takes the sweetness off the lemonade and it's not so alcoholic so it quenches thirst. But if you try order it in a pub you get funny looks.
    • CommentAuthorSteveZ
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2020
     
    Almost cider shandy.
    In my student days I used to drink Lemontops in The Shipwrights Arms in Poole. It was a cheap drink for students on a grant, being scrumpy with lemonade added to make it drinkable! :bigsmile:
    It had some drawbacks when consumed in quantity, but fortunately it also wiped most of the resulting memories!!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2020
     
    Thread seems to have lost its way

    activities on your home while under lockdown

    Preventative maintenance

    Insulate pipes and cisterns in the loft, replace ball valves or at least the ball valve washer, check cistern lid and cistern insulation

    Overhaul incoming mains stop tap, check water board outside stop cock

    Clean and very lightly silicone oil all window ironmongery patio doors.

    Adjust kitchen cupboard doors, refit buffers, replace broken hinges and drawer runners, tighten loose handles

    Internal doors, wipe hinges with silicone wipe, clean, adjust latches, tighten loose handles, very tiny squirt of silicone oil into lock part.

    Service kitchen, utility and bathroom taps

    Simple improvements

    Draughtproofing – windows, doors, floors, ceilings, penetrations, round pipes, beside wires in ceiling roses etc

    Check insulation, replace any missing or displaced pieces, upgrade loft insulation to 400mm.

    Replace heating controller and thermostat with a better form of control like a programmable room thermostat or smart controller like Hive or Nest.

    Draught seal under window boards, round loft hatch architraves, round service pipes, through floor boards and under skirtings.

    Seal draughts and air infiltration coming into your first floor void.

    Add insulation to hot cylinder and the nearby pipes

    Aspirations

    Reduce heat loss and energy use

    Wall insulation aim to achieve a U value of 0.1

    Ceiling insulation aim to achieve a U value of below 0.1

    Floor insulation insulation aim to achieve a U value of 0.2

    Windows and doors, forget double glazing and plan on having triple glazing.

    Build your own house – start deciding what it should be like now.
  6.  
    Good list, Tony! Thanks.

    Currently trying to crack on with drainage membrane/insulate/plasterboard to cellar. Started 4 years ago and regularly interrupted by real life! Have membranes and tapes, have some of the insulation for walls. Order in for floor insulation, but merchant out of stock. Can't find anyone to deliver plasterboard. It's my own job so even if I had a van - I don't - I couldn't use click and collect. Will probably grind to a halt on the 'main front' soon due to lack of materials, but a fair bit of snagging to do on earlier work. In between all this working on webinars and 'e-learning' for providers I usually do face-to-face teaching for, and helping occasional existing clients by phone and e-mail with the help of pictures and tortuous explanations.

    To augment Tony's list above grommets for cables (e.g. at ceiling roses) can be made with offcut of EPDM and air-tightness tape.
    • CommentAuthordickster
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2020
     
    Definitely veered off, sorry.

    That's some list!
  7.  
    Home improvement has gone very slow here as I now have to home-school the kids all day and video call the elderlies for half the evening, on top of doing my own day's worth of stuff. Plus it takes ages to get materials delivered online. How is anyone else making their time go further?
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2020
     
    Yesterday, I repositioned a garage door opening closing switch.

    Have a Hormann door so X years ago, bought two additional remote openers. I fitted them into a light switch back box and in turn, fitted into the Fermacell. They are activated by a non-latching switch, which I also adapted so that when pressed, the internal rocker, pushes a shortened nail onto the opener button. Works fine.

    Fortunately, the location of one of the switches is where I subsequently found it convenient to hang a ladder, so the switch was not so accessible.

    Now it has been repositioned, the previous position hole sealed with another bit of Fermacell and all looking good.

    Been intending to do that job for years, so now another one ticked off.
    • CommentAuthordereke
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2020
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenHome improvement has gone very slow here as I now have to home-school the kids all day and video call the elderlies for half the evening, on top of doing my own day's worth of stuff. Plus it takes ages to get materials delivered online. How is anyone else making their time go further?


    I work from home anyway and the kids are usually home-schooling so not much change here.
    In an attempt to get more done I've been starting work earlier and taking the afternoons off.

    Started out at 6am, then moved to 5am, now I'm thinking about starting the night before so I can have the whole day to do jobs around the house :wink:
  8.  
    Posted By: derekeStarted out at 6am, then moved to 5am, now I'm thinking about starting the night before so I can have the whole day to do jobs around the house

    I am left wondering how many of the changes (home office, flexible working hours etc) will stay after the virus has gone.
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press