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    • CommentAuthorShevek
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013
     
    Posted By: Simon StillWhy does it have to be salt free?

    Because then you don't have worry about keeping it fed. And you can drink it without having a heart attack.
  1.  
    >>Keeping it fed

    True. But if empty you get hard water for a week or two - not 'no water'. Easier than cleaning off limescale and by all accounts the ones without salt don't work - a number of threads here in the past.


    >>And you can drink it without having a heart attack.

    I thought the increase in Sodium was negligible in reality and, regardless, easily addressed by putting a non-softened supply to the kitchen tap (I think I'm going to do my en-suite cold supply as well).
    • CommentAuthorShevek
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013
     
    Posted By: Simon StillTrue. But if empty you get hard water for a week or two - not 'no water'. Easier than cleaning off limescale and by all accounts the ones without salt don't work - a number of threads here in the past.

    Don't like it. It's too easily forgotten about.

    I thought the increase in Sodium was negligible in reality and, regardless, easily addressed by putting a non-softened supply to the kitchen tap (I think I'm going to do my en-suite cold supply as well).

    Not according to Southern Water.
  2.  
    Whereas this piece in the Telegraph, and many others on the web, say you've got far more worrying sources of salt to worry about. Processed food? Mass produced bread? Crisps?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/propertyadvice/jeffhowell/9924702/Jeff-Howell-is-it-dangerous-to-drink-soft-water.html

    And of course not a problem at all if you have a hard water tap for drinking.

    That piece also says "the magnetic or electric water-treatment gadgets widely advertised are not water softeners. They are claimed to prevent limescale forming, but I have not been able to find independent scientific evidence to show that they have any effect at all."
  3.  
    @db8000 There doesn't appear to be any scientific evidence to back up the effectiveness of the "catalytic" water conditioners of the type in your link on the previous page, do you have any info?

    http://www.chem1.com/CQ/catscams.html

    They are not cheap either, no prices on the UK website but the larger domestic unit is the equivalent of almost £700 on the companies' aussie website.
    • CommentAuthorShevek
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: Simon StillThat piece also says "the magnetic or electric water-treatment gadgets widely advertised are not water softeners. They are claimed to prevent limescale forming, but I have not been able to find independent scientific evidence to show that they have any effect at all."

    It also says a salt-free one passed W512 (the AQAtotal). And I believe others have since too.
    • CommentAuthorShevek
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013
     
    What's Ceramet?
    http://www.aquatiere.co.uk/refill-pouch
    • CommentAuthordb8000
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013
     
    Hi Chris, I don't have one but came across them via a friend of mine. Just throwing the link out there!
    Dave
  4.  
    Posted By: Shevek
    Posted By: Simon StillThat piece also says "the magnetic or electric water-treatment gadgets widely advertised are not water softeners. They are claimed to prevent limescale forming, but I have not been able to find independent scientific evidence to show that they have any effect at all."

    It also says a salt-free one passed W512 (the AQAtotal). And I believe others have since too.


    Did you get a price on the Aqa total? It looks nice but seems to be rather expensive, the only price I can find online is in Canada and it's the equivalent of almost £2500 :shocked:

    Replacement filters are expensive too so I don't know if it is any cheaper to run than a salt softener, just more convenient and no issue with drinking.
  5.  
    Why do you want to drink the water from the water softener? The kitchen tap should be direct from the water main or from the water main via a water filter. I thought this was a legal requirement.

    David
    • CommentAuthorbillt
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2013 edited
     
    "Although there is no absolute legal requirement in
    the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations, 1999, the
    British Water Code of Practice recommends that a mains
    water tap should be fitted, where reasonably practicable,
    when an ion-exchange water softener is installed"

    According to http://www.britishwater.co.uk/water_treatment/water_softening.aspx who seem to be some sort of trade body, so probably ought to know!

    We don't have a tap providing unsoftened water, because it would be extremely difficult to feed from our system, and I don't think that it is a significant health risk. The water tastes a bit worse than the unsoftened variety though (but not nearly as bad as the over-chlorinated stuff that water authorities supply).
  6.  
    We are considering the Scaleout type anti scale product, seems to provide all the benefit of water softener without the hassle of providing special drinking water outlets and the refilling of salt/beads etc. Seems no brainer but may be I am missing something?
    • CommentAuthorSeret
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: calvinmiddleI was advised by my plumber that if I added a salt based water softener to my combi boiler system to supple both hot and cold feeds with softened water that it would invalidate my new boiler warranty as the softened water would be crossive to the aluminium heat exchanger.


    Could well be, salt and aluminium don't get on at all well. Chloride ions strip away the protective oxide layer that forms on the surface and you'll get pitting. Do boilers have sacrificial anodes in them? I know some hot water gear like tanks do. If so it should get picked up on an annual servicing, bit harsh to try and squirm out of the warranty IMO.
    • CommentAuthormaxelaine
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2017
     
    We're going to fit a salt-using ion exchange type WS in our new build. Any recommendations on ones to buy or avoid?
    • CommentAuthorRobL
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2017
     
    We have one from Monarch, it's "just worked" for about 5 years. Every 3-5 months it needs a 10kg bag of salt pouring in, that's it. Get one with a big enough tank so you're not filling it all the time. Worth getting water hardness testing stuff, so you can check it's working too. All our cold taps are non softened - in fact, the softened just goes to the hot water header tank - so it does the washing m/c, shower hot&cold.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2017
     
    Posted By: maxelaineWe're going to fit a salt-using ion exchange type WS in our new build. Any recommendations on ones to buy or avoid?

    Asking the same question in multiple threads is not very helpful.
    See the other thread for my answer.
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