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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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  1.  
    Currently using a bagged Miele vacuum around the house. We normally pick up bags on eBay that usually come with filters in the ratio of 10 bags to 2 filters

    Where can I buy a sheet of pre motor filters, exhaust filters and it also has a carbon filter (hepa)?

    I'd like to change the filters same time as every bag.

    In addition, can anyone recommend decent site vacuums? Are the Henry's still the builders choice?
    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2020
     
    Henry's pretty robust,if you got some spare cash and want quality Festool vacs have nice long power leads and long hoses, filter very fine (there are choices) end of the hose has bluetooth so you switch of where you happen to be. If you plug in a power tool and switch the tool on the vac starts up. Don't leave it around on site it will get nicked.
    • CommentAuthorSilky
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2020
     
    I have 2 Karchers cost around the 80 - 100 Euro mark. I think WD3200 and WD32 but basically the same thing, basic model. They have both been going for respectively 6 and 8 years. The 1st one is used constantly for sucking dirt, sand, plaster, cement..realy useful when cleaning up rough areas before pointing and trying to work out what stay and what goes.. also used an awful lot as an extractor with my Makita plunge saw and for my chop saw. I broke the 1st one early on because I tried to be clever and use it without a bag.. I sent it back and they fixed it and with instructions to always use a bag. I now have a re-useable bag off Amazon, that cost about 15 Euro, really great and does the job too. The filters keep going too, I bought a couple of spares but think I only destroyed 1 or 2 in 8 years, you can take them out and clean them with a blast of air from a compressor or another vacuum and they keep going. Last trick, sometimes when needing to get water out of awkard places I've used them to suck up water, but then you MUST remove the bag and not over do it.. then take the filter out and let it dry. Compared to all the crap house vacuums I've had they've been great, although of course you need to invest a little time with adapters and gaffa tape to get things running smoothly.
    • CommentAuthorSimonD
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: Victorianeco

    In addition, can anyone recommend decent site vacuums? Are the Henry's still the builders choice?


    When I started my building project, I went the whole hog and bought a Nilfisk Attix 33 class M extractor. I fell off the chair at the price but you can get one from places like D & M tools for about £400 at the moment. It's been amazing and has stood up to serious abuse and exposure to the elements.

    I now only wish I'd bought the larger size one.

    I've seen lots of threads on builders forums questioning the need for class M filtration but when I've done large amounts of cutting with it always connected to my tools, going through 100s of square meters of osb for floor walls, roofs and ceilings as well as all the floor joists and stick timer frame with very little saw dust, that's when it pays its dividends...well, for me anyway :smile:
    • CommentAuthordereke
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2020
     
    This is really interesting as I'm planning to get a site vac soon to use with my tools.

    I've been thinking about getting a cordless circular saw as I'm going to be doing a loft conversion and seems like a good idea to have one less cable. Hooking up dust extraction is a step backwards from that perspective (but essential!) BUT is there anyway of triggering the vac to start when the tool is used? I know it works for wired tools.
    • CommentAuthorSimonD
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2020
     
    Posted By: derekeThis is really interesting as I'm planning to get a site vac soon to use with my tools.

    I've been thinking about getting a cordless circular saw as I'm going to be doing a loft conversion and seems like a good idea to have one less cable. Hooking up dust extraction is a step backwards from that perspective (but essential!) BUT is there anyway of triggering the vac to start when the tool is used? I know it works for wired tools.


    I think your only option with a cordless and the vac is to run it on constant, maybe it's worth a search to see if someone's come up with something new. But I'm not sure whether these cordless units provide good extractor connectors?

    In terms of working with the cords, you just have to adapt how you work sometimes. Because I'm doing everything on my own, most of my timber has been cut on the delivered stack of wood so as far as possible I'm moving cut pieces which makes it lighter and easier to handle. So I rig up the extractor and saw next to the stack and just work away there.

    The only cordless tools I've used during my build are an impact driver and drill/driver. Everything else has been corded or compressed air. I've found these tools typically give you better bang for your buck and have better power spec. For example, my primary circular saw, Festool HK85 has an 85mm depth of cut and my seconday saw, a Bosch professional cuts to 70mm. The Bosch you can buy for just over £100 and you're ready to go. A cordless one is going to cost you a lot more than that once you've factored in a couple of decent capacity batteries and charger.

    However, one word of caution about the extractor and tool connection is to carefully check the connectors before buying. Festool is really good for extractor connections, but my Bosch circular saw isn't. I've also found that some companies like to make their own proprietary connectors that won't fit universal ones - I found this with my jigsaw, which was a pain.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2020 edited
     
    I've have an earlier and slightly larger model of this machine from Numatic ( same company as Henry machines but from their industrial range ), for over 16 years and still going strong.
    I can still get spares, and even the bags for my machine have been upgraded through the years, although the machine model has long since been superseded. The hoses etc, are all industry standard, none of the gimmicky stuff you find on many constantly changing German machines. The Company ( Numatic ) are first class IMO.

    https://numatic.co.uk/product/tradeline-tem390a/
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2020 edited
     
    Except our genuine-Numatic/Henry stainless taper-fit tubes jam together in normal use and can't be easily separated; one that goes into the genuine pickup terminal can't be extracted whatever I do. Previous chrome plated cheapos worked fine in that respect (though they rusted).
    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2020
     
    The problem with stainless on stainless is that stainless "picks up" from one another and sticks. I worked in an industry where to overcome this problem different grades of stainless was used e.g the nut would be a different makeup to the bolt.
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2020 edited
     
    I'm planning to buy a new one myself soon, so I'll watch this thread with interest, but it will be a Class M (medium filter) model - the minimum required for most most building-related dusts. See also https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis69.pdf

    I'll also be looking at getting a dust control cyclone system to trap much of the dust before it reaches the vacuum, particularly for joinery use.
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