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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2020
     
    What ho one and all,

    A non-to-practical friend has asked my assistance in hanging his external letterbox, which has fallen off his flint / lime mortar wall.

    I suggested a pair of battens fixed to the wall and the letterbox can then be screwed to the battens. But what is the best way to get a solid fixing into the lime mortar?

    Thanks and toodle pip
  1.  
    Err, studding all the way through? No, that's not tongue-in-cheek. I had to do that with some corbels for an extension where the stone rear elevation of the original house was horrendously friable. Steel plate on the inside, and IWI, in that case.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2020
     
    Posted By: RexBut what is the best way to get a solid fixing into the lime mortar?

    Lime mortar isn't very strong so it won't take much to pull fixings out. What I did with our downpipes, which are fixed to lime render on straw bales, was to glue some pre-drilled wood plugs into the surface with a mess of epoxy and then fix the downpipes into the wood plugs. The idea was to spread the loads as much as possible. Nothing's fallen off yet :cool: I don't know whether that technique could be adapted to a flint wall; maybe if there's enough mortar between the flints to glue some fixings in? Otherwise you could try gluing some battens to the surface over a fairly large area or try Nick's idea.
  2.  
    Posted By: Nick ParsonsErr, studding all the way through? No, that's not tongue-in-cheek. I had to do that with some corbels for an extension where the stone rear elevation of the original house was horrendously friable. Steel plate on the inside, and IWI, in that case.

    +1
    or what I have done with my stone/rubble/earth wall was to hammer in sharpened wooden pegs as far as I could an then saw off flush then screw into the peg with minimum size drill so that the screw expands the peg and increases grip. (This was to put up a curtain rail !!)
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2020 edited
     
    I would bang two wooden pegs into the wall and make new holes in the letter box to suit and screw into them
  3.  
    We have some 120mm hammer-in frame fixings left over, I use them for these lightweight jobs. Maybe overkill but they go a long way into the mortar joint and then expand against the stone so don't seem to come out.

    When I drill the hole, the mortar at the surface crumbles around the bit so the mouth of the hole ends up over sized, I put a glob of mastic in to keep water out.
    • CommentAuthorCliff Pope
    • CommentTimeNov 15th 2020
     
    Fit the letter box somewhere else - on a post perhaps?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 15th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: Cliff PopeFit the letter box somewhere else - on a post perhaps?

    Excellent idea!
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeNov 16th 2020
     
    Gentlemen,

    Thanks for the suggestions. I do like the idea of a larger hole and gluing in a wooden peg.

    I also have some frame fixings but don't think they are 120mm, more likely 80mm. Probably not deep enough but may be worth a try.

    Not possible to put the letterbox elsewhere; all walls are flint / lime mortar.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 16th 2020
     
    Posted By: RexNot possible to put the letterbox elsewhere; all walls are flint / lime mortar.

    That's probably why a separate post was suggested.
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