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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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      CommentAuthornigel
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: ArtiglioApologies for being off topic, but i’m currently putting some life back into an old barn/oast, only listed in ‘74 and has all sortsmof add ons and changes to what alledgedly may be bits of a building thats been on site since around 1750 ( personally i’d challenge anyone to find a bit of it). Only one window is properly old, then its 1960’s sashes and 70’s casements , with a few old crittals and a likely 1930’s casement bay.
    My local council despite declaring a climate emergency last year , has an outright ban on any form of double glazing, in listed buildings. Though apparently a couple of buildings have managed it on appeal.


    I have done it a few times, they don't like you getting rid of the old float glass even in singled glazed windows. The ones I have done have been at the rear of town centre properties.
    They focus on the front elevation and the rears they tend to be pretty relaxed about.

    I suspect with a normal domestic dwelling they could be more demanding.

    Always worth asking as there is enormous variation in what they let you do.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2020
     
    Posted By: ArtiglioMy local council despite declaring a climate emergency last year , has an outright ban on any form of double glazing, in listed buildings. Though apparently a couple of buildings have managed it on appeal.

    There ought to be some method of making an 'appeal on principle' or something to force councils to change obviously wrong policies.
  1.  
    Timber ordered...

    90mm x 65mm softwood for the frames rebated to accept 8.8mm laminated glass
    18mm x 15mm chamfered wedge bead
    Hardwood sills

    Just reading up online, the best joint for a relative novice I believe is a basic half lap joint, glued and then screwed? Not quite a mortice and tenon but seems okay?

    Going to be an interesting project for myself
  2.  
    You could also use a biscuit joint (if you have access to a cutter) or a doweled joint
  3.  
    Timber has arrrived, just a quick one. As the timber is rebated, would a 45deg mitre joint be best so the rebates line up continuously?
    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2020
     
    You could but not as strong as doing as doing a mortise and tenon or bridle joint and mitre the "beading". It is a big window don't compromise.
  4.  
    8.8mm Optilam has been in for 4 weeks and one of the panes has cracked....

    Supplier taking no responsibility, simply saying they supplied only, not even interested in coming out to look

    The glass is Pilkington Optilam so should have some kind of warranty on the product. These are £500 panes!

    We ensured there was 10mm tolerance (5mm around the whole glass)

    What could have gone wrong?
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2021 edited
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoWhat could have gone wrong?


    Glass is surprisingly strong and bendy so I'd guess it pressed on some thing hard somewhere weakening an edge or possibly vandalism...

    Can't claim a huge expertise here apart from I had a [much smaller] sheet fail and found an edge pressing on a nail a long time ago.

    Can't see you getting any luck on a warranty if it was supply only to a DIY speced window frame.

    You may have some luck with insurance...
  5.  
    Posted By: jms452Glass is surprisingly strong and bendy so I'd guess it pressed on some thing hard somewhere weakening an edge or possibly vandalism...

    +1
    Posted By: jms452had a [much smaller] sheet fail and found an edge pressing on a nail

    +1
    If the edge was chipped during installation this could create a fracture point that could later run due to some other stress e.g. temperature.
    Posted By: jms452You may have some luck with insurance...

    Read the policy carefully. Could it have been vandalism or could a stone have been flipped up from a passing car?
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