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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorDur
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2020
     
    We have an internal chimney stack with 3 flues . Two are redundant and will be filled with glass beads (I think) up to an air brick in the loft. The other we might use for a log burner for occasional use in the fullness of time.

    Upstairs one side of the stack is a bedroom, the other the landing. We have the plaster off and I would like to put some insulation around the stack mostly so it is not so cold to the touch. There is not a lot of space and was wondering about eg 25 mm Kingspan 107 foamed on, taped and then plasterboard plus some mechanical fixings.

    Does anyone know if K107 is OK to use against a chimney? I believe that the phenolic stuff is not flammable but can't find anything on this. Hopefully flames never get out of the chimney and it would be lined etc but not really the point and anyway only a single brick so wouldn't actually take that much if something went wrong.
    Or any (probably) better ideas very welcome!
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2020
     
    Posted By: Durmostly so it is not so cold to the touch

    You don't need much insulation to accomplish that. A thin layer of cork or pretty much anything else would do. I don't know much about chimneys and flammable things, so I'll leave others to answer that.
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2020
     
    Sounds like the brickwork is cold because its effectively an uninsulated solid brick external wall. Once you fill the two unused flues with insulation things will start to warm up. For the wood burner flue, if you fit the liner and insulate round it your cold brick work should warm up as it wont be exposed to ambient temps with all three flues insulated.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2020
     
    And depending how often it is used you could put a chimney balloon in it to reduce airflow.
    • CommentAuthorDur
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2020
     
    Thanks for the various thoughts. Given the plaster is mostly off I am tempted then to try plastering with some insulating type plaster which I would hope will give a slightly warmer feel but at the same time keep a little bit of mass within the structure as there will be precious little upstairs.
    I expect not enough to make much difference but maybe interesting to try and I am having to learn just about every other skill for this project.

    Or is there a "plasterboard" which has some thermal benefit and still fire safe? That is not a pb with eg pir glued to it...
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2020
     
    I wouldnt worry about insulating/fire proofing the brickwork if you are lining and insulating the woodburner flue. The flue will contain all the flue gasses and the brickwork will provide all the fire protection you need, if the liner should fail. So long as you close the chimney where the liner passes through the first floor ceiling level and this area is insulated, then the chimney breast in the bedroom/landing is within the insulated house. There'll be a bit of a cold bridge where the chimney stack passes into the loft but if you insulate the stack inside and out for a couple of feet above the ceiling level then conducted losses will be minimal.
    • CommentAuthorDur
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2020
     
    Thanks Phil
    I hadn't thought about the conductivity so yes, I will make a collar in the loft as well.
    • CommentAuthorPetlyn
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2020
     
    If you are looking for some glass beads - we have some remaining from our low carbon build. 4-8m in diameter in 0.5m3 big bags.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2020
     
    Wrap it in quilt in the loft to 1m above the loft insulation 400mm thick, use rock-wool
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2020
     
    And fill the 3 flues to the same height internally.

    If the woodburner liner isnt insulated then insulate the liner or fill the flue to the top to keep the liner toasty, obviously with something suitable for the heat. Properly close the flue at the top to stop water ingress
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