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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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  1.  
    Evening all

    Looking to heat up some floors to assist with flood restoration. The process is simply to heat up one section of the floor and then use a a small tent and then a vortex fan to 'vacuum' out the warm wet air from the floor and vent to outside...

    Looking for an infrared heater that can be mounted parallel to the floor but I cannot seem to find any suppliers in my google search....

    Any suggestions?

    I was even thinking of using chicken brooding lamps connected up to an extended tripod set up... that type of thing....
  2.  
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2021
     
    I would prefer a fan or fan heater on cold rather than heat
  3.  
    I'm not sure why?

    The heating of the floor will allow any trapped water become water vapour, this is then drawn out via drawing drier air through the floor and essentially being sucked out....
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2021
     
    Keeping the ventilation high keeps water vapour gradient steep and drying takes place

    Heating with ventilation will work too but higher levels of ventilation will be needed

    As the surface is heated yes it will dry out but deeper down vapour can condense typically on top of dpm and be reabsorbed into the concrete,

    Opening the windows works best,
  4.  
    Yes but if windows cannot be left open for security reasons then one way is to get the water out from the floor via heating the floor and effectively pulling through the drier air. this then leaves the refrigerant to do it's trick and pump the collected water down the sink etc.

    I suppose in theory you could just heat the air as it's getting pulled through but direct heat is better
    • CommentAuthorJeff B
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2021
     
    Fan heater plus dehumidifier? (if windows can't be opened)
    • CommentAuthorjfb
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2021
     
    Indeed, why not a large dehumidifier? Needs windows to be closed, gives off its own heat once it gets going, sucks out the water.
  5.  
    Well 2 of the larger organisations for flood restoration recommend negative pressure drying and heating of floors.

    A conventional dehumidifier takes ages to dry a screed floor that's saturated for instance

    So speed is of the essence in the insurance game
    • CommentAuthorJeff B
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2021
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoWell 2 of the larger organisations for flood restoration recommend negative pressure drying and heating of floors.

    A conventional dehumidifier takes ages to dry a screed floor that's saturated for instance

    So speed is of the essence in the insurance game


    Exactly, so use a fan heater and a dehumidifier together. If it's a big room then hire a beastie heater like this:
    https://www.hss.com/hire/p/retail-fan-heater-2-8kw
  6.  
    I've got those, but I need to heat the floor not the air around it...
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2021
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoI've got those, but I need to heat the floor not the air around it...

    You need to heat both. Some chicken heaters or something else to heat the floor. Fan heaters to blow lots of warm air across to evaporate the water and carry it away. And maybe a dhumidifier to take the moisture out, or maybe just big fans to blow it out the door and bring fresh cold and therefore dry air in through the window.
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