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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthordaveking66
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2021 edited
     
    I’m currently planning an IWI project for my home and am trying to find whether there are any implications for my home insurance policy.

    Specifically, can anyone advise:
    If I need to make my insurer aware of my plans to fit internal wall insulation?
    Whether it will incur a rise to the premium?
    And if so, whether they view synthetic PIR type insulation and natural woodfibre based products differently?
  1.  
    AFAIK as a non-lawyer, you can add any kind of insulation inside/outside/loft/wherever and it doesn't affect the insurance *so long as it complies with building regs/stds*, same as any modification or refurbishment. If you are in England you will get a completion certificate from your building control officer which will prove compliance.

    Insurance is only affected if you do something that affects the rebuilding cost of the house, like extending its floor area, or if you did work that didn't comply with building regs, such as a DIY rewire.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2021
     
    Posted By: WillInAberdeenyou will get a completion certificate from your building control officer which will prove compliance

    I think strictly a certificate from building control doesn't prove anything - the owner is ultimately responsible for everything and continues to be so. It is a fair indication of quality though, and *not* having one is an even better indication of a lack of quality.

    Insurance is only affected if you do something that affects the rebuilding cost of the house, like extending its floor area, or if you did work that didn't comply with building regs, such as a DIY rewire.

    Internal insulation will affect the rebuilding cost to some extent. It might also affect e.g. the fire risk and given the 'Uberrima fides' basis of insurance contracts, I think it would be wise to contact your insurance company. I would hope it wouldn't increase the premium, but if it does then it's time to shop around.
    • CommentAuthordaveking66
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2021
     
    Thanks both.

    Fire risk was the one I was thinking about after reading the Grenfell tower discussion on here
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