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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2021
     
    There's a review of an analysis of various types of IWI at https://energy-surprises.blogspot.com/2021/03/field-tests-on-thin-insulation-for.html

    I just thought I'd point it out and leave it to others to decide whether it says anything useful :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    Neither paint nor latex comply with part L1b of the building regulations.

    I would class eps as breathable

    Were floor void zones insulated or omitted from the IWI process, this could explain no increase in airtightness.

    Were any of the building done originally lined using dot and dabbed plasterboard?
    • CommentAuthorJeff B
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021 edited
     
    I have never come across this "Energy Thoughts" blog before but there is a lot of interesting stuff on there. Regarding the paint - I'm sure most people would be sceptical about the insulating properties of this but I did once paint the inside of a solid chapel wall using Thermilate glass spheres mixed into the emulsion paint and it immediately solved the problem of condensation, presumably by simply raising the temperature of the wall just enough above the dew point.

    One thing that stood out for me regarding the thin insulation article was this: "You may be tempted to leave details such as coving or cornicing in place and insulate around them but the simulations found this would be a bad idea; you get thermal bridges and possible condensation on those surfaces". It stood out because that is exactly what I am proposing for the two external walls in my lounge when I eventually get around to doing IWI in there! Is it really such a serious condensation risk?

    My coving is about 75mm high/75mm deep so I propose to "sculpture" the top of the 75mm Celotex board so as to roughly fit the curve of the coving and fill any gaps with foam. Then plasterboard over and fit new matching coving to that.
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    To get it clear, so the internal edge of the extg coving will touch the back of the plasterboard?

    The new coving will have a 45o bevelled back face? After Cellotexing incl sculpting it into the extg coving, you could fit a triangular fillet along the Cellotex/ceiling angle, plasterboard up to that, and fit the new coving tight to the fillet. That way, Cellotex thickness is pretty much maintained to bury the extg coving.

    What about the floor ceiling void above? if not being Cellotexed down onto the top of your ceiling, that will be your condensation magnet.
    • CommentAuthorLF
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    Thanks for sharing djh - good link and good info.
    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    Jeff, surely it’ll be at least as time consuming and messy shaping the insulation around the coving as it would be to take the coving off and board it properly. What benefits are there to leaving it in place?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    I took it that his 'coving' is traditional plaster - if it's just the shaped-plasterboard type then yes, knock it off.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    Posted By: fostertomI took it that his 'coving' is traditional plaster - if it's just the shaped-plasterboard type then yes, knock it off.

    Or shaped EPS like our previous house :devil: :bigsmile: But even if it is traditional plaster, why keep it?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    Dunno - mystical love of historic material?!
    • CommentAuthorArtiglio
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    The perils of posting having jumped to a conclusion rather than thinking first, which in this case is especially true as i’d pulled down some simple traditional cove only a couple weeks back.
    • CommentAuthorJeff B
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2021
     
    Posted By: ArtiglioJeff, surely it’ll be at least as time consuming and messy shaping the insulation around the coving as it would be to take the coving off and board it properly. What benefits are there to leaving it in place?


    Sheer laziness. No, not really! I've never taken existing coving down before (this one is plaster based, egg and dart pattern) so I'm just a bit nervous that I may damage the ceiling beyond where the new matching coving will be situated. Will it really come off that easily?

    N.B. The void above has 300mm of fibreglass quilt in place (it's a bungalow).
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2021
     
    Posted By: Jeff BSheer laziness. No, not really! I've never taken existing coving down before (this one is plaster based, egg and dart pattern) so I'm just a bit nervous that I may damage the ceiling beyond where the new matching coving will be situated. Will it really come off that easily?

    Try a small area first. If at all worried then cut between the existing cornice and the existing ceiling first so whatever you do to take the cornice out won't affect the ceiling.
    • CommentAuthornikhoward
    • CommentTimeMar 21st 2021
     
    I took the coving off when I did mine ( plasterboard type). Dead easy little damage
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