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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorShevek
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2021 edited
     
    Internal garages are semi-external spaces. Mostly unheated, with perhaps leaky doors, but protected from wind and rain. So how to deal with VCLs/breather membranes?

    Scenario: timber frame building with internal garage, the envelope of which consists of:
    1. external walls to the rear and front (with garage door)
    2. floor/ceiling above with bedroom/bathroom of associated residence on 1st floor
    3. 'internal' wall to one side adjacent lounge of associated residence
    4. party wall on other side abutting another residence

    So I'm thinking:

    1. No breather membranes except to the external walls. Internal walls and ceiling are protected from wind and rain. No VCL required to external walls either.
    2. VCL/airtightness layer to underside OSB floor deck above on warm side of insulation (bathroom/bedroom)
    3. VCL/airtightness layer to warm side of 'internal' wall (lounge)
    4. VCL/airtightness layer to warm side of party wall (other residence) but no breather membrane or VCL on garage side
      junction.png
      party_wall.png
      semi_internal_wall.png
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2021
     
    Posted By: ShevekInternal garages are semi-external spaces. Mostly unheated, with perhaps leaky doors, but protected from wind and rain. So how to deal with VCLs/breather membranes?

    Internal garages (used as such) should be outside the thermal enelope and thus outside the dwelling's airtightness and vapour management arrangements. Said things need to be continuous around the dwelling itself.

    I think your drawings look sensible but I've only checked quickly.

    Garages need to be fireproof and isolated. They need to be well ventilated. So they are usually unheated (except for possible special purpose heaters) and usually stay fairly dry though not always enough to prevent some mould.
    • CommentAuthorShevek
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Thanks Dave. Good point about ventilation, that makes sense to me, although, strangely, the building regs on ventilation (Part F) don't apply to "a garage used solely in connection with a single dwelling."

    Are you referring to any particular guidance or just your own judgement?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Posted By: ShevekAre you referring to any particular guidance or just your own judgement?

    I think the fireproofing is in Building Regs. Ventilation isn't, although I believe it may be in the Scottish version. I think the reason for the poor English guidance is the same as everything: poor maintenance of an under-developed set of rules & guidance. :( The ventilation and drainage requirement is normally associated with liquid fuels and noxious lubricants and possible spillages or fires. Maybe if there's never ever going to be an ICE car in there ...
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    I think the ventilation you need/want depends on how you use the garage. If its used to store petrol in cans or fuel tanks then plenty of vents, interlinked smoke alarm and possible drainage. If its a partly heated wood working garage with dust extraction then minimal ventilation. Too much passive ventilation in an unheated garage and theres a fair chance youll get condensation and bikes etc will come out rusty after the winter. Equally, if youre bringing a wet bike into the garage every day youll need ventilation to dry it off.
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