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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2021
     
    Saw a news item last evening of confiscated e scooters being cut up with a grinder. Surely they could have been given away to some worthy charities in countries that allow such modes of transport. All the energy going into making these scooters gone to waste seems like several thousand have been confiscated so far. Have they all been destroyed?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2021
     
    I expect that it's difficult to prove that a scooter you export isn't somehow misappropriated and reimported into the UK. Which would cause PR problems even if not real ones. So photographing destroyed scooters is the easiest way of proving that you have done your job and covered your bosses' collective ar*e.
  1.  
    I suspect safety liability and fit for purpose issues are also to the front. Hopefully the remains go to recycle rather than landfill. Also if the confiscated items are destroyed there can no claim of confiscation for profit.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2021
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryI suspect safety liability and fit for purpose issues are also to the front. Hopefully the remains go to recycle rather than landfill. Also if the confiscated items are destroyed there can no claim of confiscation for profit.
    Yes, I remember when I worked in the City liability was a major issue. There are/were lots of PCs made redundant every year but they couldn't be given away because of potential safety liability issues. Hopefully they're recycled as you say; here they should go for metals recycling.
  2.  
    https://www.nationalworld.com/lifestyle/cars/police-crush-56000-cars-as-uninsured-driving-soars-3385075

    Escooters are a drop in the ocean compared to the cars which are auctioned or scrapped by police forces, apparently the liability issues are solvable.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 25th 2021
     
    Where something has been confiscated that is worth significant money then it's worth while spending time and money checking and processing it for sale. I doubt PCs or e-scooters are worth enough. Also all cars are individually tracked by their registration numbers, so it's likely easier to know if one goes astray. JMHO.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2021
     
    I suspect most are just scooters without charger.
    • CommentAuthorCliff Pope
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2021
     
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: revor</cite> All the energy going into making these scooters gone to waste seems like several thousand have been confiscated so far. </blockquote>

    There's a war on between those wanting to legalise escooters and the authorities who don't.
    If several thousand have been confiscated so far without effect then it suggests the authorities are losing.

    They are legal in other countries, they will be legal here before long. All they are doing is glamourising their appeal and hastening the process. I'd have thought they would have learned by now that banning things that people want is doomed to failure.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2021
     
    The problem the government has is that there have been some fatal accidents involving e-scooters and they are seen by many, including me, as being ridden less responsibly than e.g. bicycles. Plus they have more utility in cities than other places, so I don't think their acceptance is a given.

    Note that it's not legal to ride an unpowered scooter on the pavement either! Same as a bicycle and all other vehicles.

    Segways are legal in some countries but not here, for example. More powerful e-bikes are legal elsewhere etc.
    • CommentAuthorJonti
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2021
     
    My wife and I were almost run over by one yesterday on our town's high street. They are so quiet that if they come up behind you you simply do not hear them. It was been steered by a young lad of about 8 or 9 years with his younger brother along for the ride.

    I think they will become more widespread but they are not fit for the road but are certainly not safe for the pavement. I can understand why they are seen as problematic. As with electric vehicles they need to be made audible.
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