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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2022
     
    What ho one and all,

    A non-practical friend has asked me for some advice and assistance with laying some boarding and vinyl onto the flor of a 3.5 x 3m shed, to be used as a pottery studio.

    The vinyl place he was visiting to get some pricing idea, have suggested they would put down 6mm ply onto which the vinyl would be glued.

    As the floor is more or less flat, but is just whatever the shed company supplied, I suggested Caber Flooring (https://www.norbord.co.uk/our-products/caberfloor/caberfloor-p5/) to give a flat and solid base.

    Personally, I like the idea that the edged t&g together which 6mm ply (most likely not WBP) will not do.

    Given that it is a regular garden shed, albeit waterproof but subjected to external humidity conditions, I feel that moisture resistant flooring would be the way to go, then the vinyl laid out top.

    Grateful for any thoughts.

    Toodle pip
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2022
     
    FWIW, I bought a shed a few years ago and then covered the floor with Caber Floor to make it a bit stronger. I didn't cover that with anything else. It's worked well so far and deals with the odd spill whilst watering plants etc.
    • CommentAuthorrevor
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2022
     
    What is the floor at moment? As DJH proposes the caber floor would be fine on it own I have it down in my joinery workshop with some 25 mm PIR below it. No need to waste money on vinyl. Depends I guess how messy a potter your friend is!
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2022
     
    If it's a run of the mill garden shed perhaps on bearers over soil or gravel with air gap underneath rats may well eat through it, to get at the tasty vinyl. Fine chicken wire first may be a prudent move whatever topcoat you use.
    If your potter friend is messy then painting the floor could be a cheaper solution to vinyl; lots of choice there.
  1.  
    I don't like vinyl on wooden floors where there is a danger of water or damp getting between the vinyl and the wood which will cause damage - more so with chip board even if it is moisture resistant. Once water or damp is under the vinyl it will stay there causing damage and rot 'cos there is no way it can dry out.

    Pottery is a 'wet craft' and I don't see how water spills can be avoided and if you have spilt water it will find its way under the vinyl.

    If the shed floor as supplied is not good enough then given its use I would be inclined to put 20mm or 25mm T&G over and then give it a coat or 2 of water based floor varnish.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2022
     
    Posted By: owlmanIf it's a run of the mill garden shed perhaps on bearers over soil or gravel with air gap underneath rats may well eat through it, to get at the tasty vinyl. Fine chicken wire first may be a prudent move whatever topcoat you use.
    If your potter friend is messy then painting the floor could be a cheaper solution to vinyl; lots of choice there.
    I built our shed on bearers but made the bearers big enough that cats can get underneath just as easily as rats or mice. I haven't seen any sign of problems :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2022
     
    Posted By: djh
    Posted By: owlmanIf it's a run of the mill garden shed perhaps on bearers over soil or gravel with air gap underneath rats may well eat through it, to get at the tasty vinyl. Fine chicken wire first may be a prudent move whatever topcoat you use.
    If your potter friend is messy then painting the floor could be a cheaper solution to vinyl; lots of choice there.
    I built our shed on bearers but made the bearers big enough that cats can get underneath just as easily as rats or mice. I haven't seen any sign of problemshttp:///newforum/extensions/Vanillacons/smilies/standard/bigsmile.gif" alt=":bigsmile:" title=":bigsmile:" >



    Mine's on sleepers and the bu..ers have eaten through it.
    • CommentAuthorJonti
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2022
     
    Posted By: djhFWIW, I bought a shed a few years ago and then covered the floor with Caber Floor to make it a bit stronger. I didn't cover that with anything else. It's worked well so far and deals with the odd spill whilst watering plants etc.


    I would second this advice. Simple, cheap and effective. If you are going to spend more money than this then a concrete base (not very green I know) is the best way to go.
  2.  
    Pottery studio: will need some heating in winter?
    Sort out the insulation under floor first, can't easily do it once floor finish is down.

    +1 what Peter said about avoiding water-damageable wood products underneath unbreathable vinyl, been there, not pretty.

    The traditional thin ply/hardboard layer was not there for strength, it was intended to smooth and drape flexibly over the millimetre-size v-grooves and humps between T&G flooring, which would otherwise show through the vinyl as faster-wearing spots as the T&G joints flexed. Some modern vinyl claims to have a cushioned backing to avoid this without needing ply/hardboard, I have no experience if this works. (If the professional flooring contractors were quoting for ply then I guess they think it's still needed!)
    • CommentAuthorSimonD
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2022
     
    Given that pottery can be quite messy and wet, I'd want additional protection for the floor. I think the buildup depends on the type of vinyl flooring being used. Is it vinyl floor planks, or is it a continuous vinyl sheet. If it's vinyl sheet is it the cheaper thin stuff or the thicker more commercially oriented stuff than get upstands and is welded at the seems? This will dictate what you need below although 6mm ply is common practise, and will use WBP ply as per the flooring standards - if this is fixed properly, with screws at something like every 100 - 150mm throughout it will serve its purpose well.

    Usually, if using an adhesive, this layer provides an addition waterproof protection for the subfloor. Otherwise, you can simply protect your subfloor with a tanking membrane. All my osb subfloors are protected by Everbuild Aquaseal tanking membrane in wet areas - bathrooms, kitchen, utility - regardless of the floor finish as this is actually specified within the subfloor manufacturers BBA certificate.
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2022
     
    Gentlemen,

    Thanks for the replies. I have told my friends and since it is only a 'garden shed' they have decided to B&Q loft boarding.

    I will be helping them lay it. I have laid some T&G boarding in my own bathroom and loft during the build but since it was all internal rather than a shed, I have some further questions.

    Would it be an idea to lay a plastic sheet as a DPM over the existing OSB shed floor?
    Should the B&Q loft floor be glued on the t&g edges and the whole floor be floating?
    No glue on the t&g but the boards screwed to the OSB sub-floor?

    I believe that the vinyl will be a one-piece sheet wrapped upwards at the edges to 'contain' any spills.

    Again, thanks
  3.  
    If it is an OSB floor as supplied and if it doesn't flex when you walk on it then I wouldn't have thought an extra layer was needed, If a bit of heavy kit was going in then perhaps overlay with more OSB to spread the load which I would use plain edged sheets of OSB screwed down - no glue gives the option to change any bits that get too worn or damaged. I wouldn't put plastic sheet between the layers of flooring and I wouldn't put anything on top of the OSB. Use OSB3.
    The B&Q loft flooring looks like ordinary chipboard - not moisture resistant, - IMO not the right sort of floor for a potters workshop.
    • CommentAuthorphiledge
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2022
     
    If its a typical shed likely the most important thing is fit guttering with downspouts directed away from the base. Without guttering or a very large eaves overhang, water will splash on the floor next to the bottom of the walls/ edge of the floor and spend the best part of the year wet.

    The trouble with ordinary vinyl is it punctures relatively easily. Dropping a screwdriver, tip down, could likely put a small hole in it and next time theres a liquid spill it will find its way through the smallest of holes and wet the flooring underneath. Because the vinyl is impervious the flooring will take a long time to dry out and if theres a further spill therell be a patch of flooring that permanently wet. Its not cheap but if youre effectively working in a wetroom Id put wetroom flooring down such as Altro.
    • CommentAuthorRex
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2022
     
    Thanks for the comments. It is of course, their call, I am just the friend with the plunge saw!

    I did run through the benefits of something that is moisture resistant, but what can I say ............? And yes, I agree that the B&Q stuff is just a fine grade chipboard. That is what I have in my loft, but since the entire roof is insulated, there is no moisture issue.

    Will mention about guttering, a very sensible consideration.
    • CommentAuthorSimonD
    • CommentTimeJan 30th 2022
     
    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryIf it is an OSB floor as supplied and if it doesn't flex when you walk on it then I wouldn't have thought an extra layer was needed,


    + 1
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJan 30th 2022
     
    Kilns and wheels can be a lot heavier than spades and lawnmowers.
  4.  
    Posted By: djhKilns and wheels can be a lot heavier than spades and lawnmowers.



    Posted By: Peter_in_HungaryIf a bit of heavy kit was going in then perhaps overlay with more OSB to spread the load which I would use plain edged sheets of OSB screwed down - no glue gives the option to change any bits that get too worn or damaged.
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