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    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2009
     
    I'm filling in the form for electicity supply to our soon to be built house and they want to know who I will buy my electicity from - so it's suddenly become a pressing problem to decide.

    We are planning to install ASHP for DHW and underfloor heating. Plan to run it at night with a decent sized thermal store (probably on economy 7/10). We plan a modest PV panel and want to sell summer excess to the grid. As we'll be very well insulated and also have solar thermal most of the ASHP output will be heating DHW autum to spring and hopefully just a small amount for underfloor heating. Even at its worst the ASHP should be significantly better than a simple immersion. (though I might just go with that on a night tariff). No mains gas to the house.
    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2009
     
    "the obligation is for the supplier to buy at the same unit rate as they sell." just read this somewhere but is it true???
    all answers really appreciated, thanks
    Robin
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2009
     
    usually they buy for more than they sell at!
  1.  
    I have just rec'd this press release:

    ''The Government has announced today the details of the proposed feed-in tariff for microgeneration from systems like small wind turbines and solar photovoltaics. The new tariff will pay for all energy generated by your system, irrespective of if you use it yourself or sell it back to the grid. The amounts paid are in addition to any saving you will make by purchasing less electricity from your supplier and any income you earn from selling your surplus power to your electricty supplier.

    The key points of the announcement are:

    - 36.5p/kWh for small solar photovoltaic systems up to 4kW and 28p/kWh for systems up to 10kW.
    - 23.0p/kWh for small wind turbines between 1.5kW and 15kW.
    - Replaces the current ROC system which pays 10p/kWh.
    - Effective as of the 1st April 2010, but all systems commissioned from now on will qualify.''

    Does this mean my 2001-installed pv and wind are not eligible? (That's not how I'd understood it up to now, but it is what the press release suggests). Poo!
    • CommentAuthorJulian
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2009 edited
     
    Nick,
    surely it means that your (and other installed pre 1.4.2010) systems will be eligible as of 1.4.2010? New systems will qualify from the outset.

    Robin,
    Good Energy pay, I think 15p and also 4.5p for "deemed" output of solar thermal - ahead of the game. From their site,
    "Good Energy’s award winning HomeGen scheme is now paying people with microgenerators such as solar panels and micro wind turbines 15p for every unit of electricity generated. Our research shows this is the highest paying reward offered by any renewable energy companies in the UK". Their buy prices may not be the cheapest. I think as Tony implies you can't have your cake etc....
  2.  
    Julian,

    I certainly hope so, but the phrase '' but all systems commissioned from now on will qualify.'' unnerved me slightly. I take it it will cover exg installations. It would be very inequitable if it didn't.
  3.  
    Does anyone have any info (on a back of a beer mat basis or otherwise) of the effect on payback (yes yes I know we should think about return on investment and all that but humour me) of the feed in tariffs on say a 2kW PV installation....?

    J
  4.  
    Appr min 14 yrs with no grant, based on £11000 purchase price, 36.5p/kWh and 15p/kWh import cost. or 11 yrs with £2500 grant, I think.

    Sums, for checking:

    1500kWh x 36.5p = 547.5

    1500 kWH x 15p if you manage to use it all = 225.

    Total £772.50.

    £11000/772.5= 14.23yrs
    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2009
     
    http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/consultations/elec_financial/elec_financial.aspx

    link to today's news on feed-in tariffs, consultation until October
  5.  
    ...so that's quite good then... especially with a grant....?

    J
  6.  
    ... so this seems quite good for new systems, do you need accredited systems and all that?

    J
    •  
      CommentAuthorted
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2009
     
    Nick, existing systems that are ROC registered will get transferred into the new FITs scheme automatically but only at the 9p per kWh on total generation rate. Export rates are not yet defined.

    James, new systems must be MCS accredited (both the product and the installer) to qualify for FITs, so DIY systems will be excluded. LCBP grants are theoretically still available for new systems until next March or until the money runs out - whichever is the sooner. The FITs scheme guarantees tariffs to new systems for 20 years from next April. If you install a system between now and then you will qualify for both a LCBP grant (if there is any cash left) and the higher tariffs but will have 6 months knocked off that 20 year period.

    These comments are all based upon the current DECC proposals so the details could change if the response to the consultation warrants it.
    • CommentAuthorDavipon
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2009
     
    Just got this info from a supplier.
    Subject: Fwd: Power purchase agreement information

    Dear Sir
    To be eligible for any of the schemes, we request that customers meet the following criteria:
    You will need to have the necessary grid connection approval for the export/ total generation meter installation from your local Distribution Network Operator (DNO). Your system installer will usually make the necessary arrangements to obtain grid connection permission from your area DNO on your behalf.

    Sub 10kWp Export scheme
    This agreement covers wind, solar and small scale hydro energy technology in residential situations up to 10kW of installed load. There are two options for this size of installation.

    Option A- You will need to have an export meter installed to measure the amount of electricity that your installation exports. Our current domestic export rate is 7.64p per unit (kWh) for wind and solar installations, and 5.00p per unit (kWh) for small scale hydro. This will be paid annually by cheque.

    Option B- This option is unmeasured therefore we do not require you to have an export meter fitted. For this option you will receive £10.00 per kW of installed load per annum, payable by cheque.

    Sub 5kWp Total generation scheme
    This agreement covers wind and solar energy technology in residential situations up to 5kW of installed load. For this agreement we require you to have an Ofgem accredited total generation meter. These are sometimes included when you purchase renewable technology so it’s important to check with your installer.

    For this agreement the rate payable is 10.00p per unit (kWh) for every unit generated by the installation, even the units you use, and is paid annually by cheque. In addition to this you will sign over the Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROC’s) that you will accrue by having renewable technology installed,

    6kWp- 30kWp Total generation scheme
    This agreement covers wind and solar energy technology of 6kW-30kW of installed load. For this agreement we require you to have an Ofgem accredited total generation meter. As above, check with your installer to see if this is included with your renewable technology.
    For this agreement the rate payable is 9.00p per unit (kWh) for every unit generated by the installation, even the units you use, and is paid annually by cheque. In addition to this you will sign over the Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROC’s) that you will accrue by having renewable technology installed,
    •  
      CommentAuthorted
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2009
     
    That's not a good deal. There are much better ones available if you shop around - especially for PV.
    • CommentAuthorStuartB
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2009
     
    Posted By: Nick ParsonsJulian,

    I certainly hope so, but the phrase '' but all systems commissioned from now on will qualify.'' unnerved me slightly. I take it it will cover exg installations. It would be very inequitable if it didn't.


    Nick - why don't you de-commission your system then have it re-commissioned by the accredited bodies? :bigsmile:
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