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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorjon
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2013 edited
     
    Hi John

    Yes.. promotion thing only lasted from 8am to about 5pm. If it's of interest, the first part can be picked up here:

    http://stone-hinge.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/sample-of-stonehenge-solving-neolithic.html
  1.  
    Current erratum from Mckay blog site

    http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/sustainable/book/tex/Errata.pdf

    Just wish a revised edition would be published using peer reviewed data
    • CommentAuthorjon
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2013
     
    Do you think it is not peer reviewed John?
  2.  
    <blockquote><cite>Posted By: jon</cite>Do you think it is not peer reviewed John?</blockquote>

    Jon

    Far to many errors for it to be peer reviewed. You only have to look at the errata above to wonder whether it was even reviewed by an editor. I do believe it has got a hidden agenda and it definitely seems like a pro nuclear book taking a pot shot at renewables.
    • CommentAuthorjon
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2013 edited
     
    Hi John

    Peer review takes different forms. If you submit an article to a learned institution, they will select a reviewer from the most appropriate panel: For example, an article on Sustainability would usually get passed to one of us on the Sustainability Panel depending on who has the most expertise. Some articles are reviewed by the whole panel if they are contentious.

    Private journal publishers tend to have a selection of experts who perform the same sort of service, though the editor usually filters out all articles before they get considered. Though there have been rumblings recently about this arrangement being outdated because of the restricted (costly) access to privately published journals.

    Books have a slightly different process. However, this book has been endorsed by a very large number of high level experts in the field, which is the best form of peer review that you can get. It's a free book: You can download it for nothing. The fact that it has an errata sheet shows that there has been a large amount of criticism and review.

    They have a contact form which allows people to send through comments and criticisms: Might be worth getting involved if you believe that there are errors?
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2013
     
    Posted By: jonIf you submit an article to a learned institution, they will select a reviewer...

    More usually, a few reviewers.
    • CommentAuthorjon
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2013
     
    Hi Ed

    It's difficult to source reviewers and more than two would be unusual in the Institutions that I am a member of. Occasionally special expertise Panels get asked en mass to have a look at something, so in that case you might have ten or so of us looking at it.

    Are things different at the Institutions that you do peer review for?
  3.  
    Here is a lecture along the same lines.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5bVbfWuq-Q


    Hope everyone can critically appraise and point out what is fundamentally wrong with his analysis.
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2013
     
    Posted By: jonAre things different at the Institutions that you do peer review for?

    I'm not a scientist. However, everything relevant I read from professional astronomers and climate scientists implies more than just one reviewer for papers in most publications.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2013
     
    Posted By: renewablejohnHope everyone can critically appraise and point out what is fundamentally wrong with his analysis.
    The only thing I could see missing on the first viewing is that he does not take into account the area that mining and processing of uranium into account (this could be applied to any technology). Assuming that the processing takes place in the UK, then that is in the 125 kWh/day figure, though the embodies energy is not. He did not mention the processing and embodied energy in biomass either though, so they could be considered on a level playing field there. Without studying the underlying data it is impossible to say. The ratios look right though, but I would say that as I agree with him about using numbers. Odd how during my dissertation in solar thermal power I came up with similar numbers once the difference efficiencies was taken into account.

    Is it the low yield from biomass you dislike and disagree with?

    Posted By: jonAre things different at the Institutions that you do peer review for?
    Eventhough I am only a lowly Research Masters student, I have to get involved in the peer review system. I have at least 4 people who review my work, five if it includes something specialised like statistics or renewables (trying to keep away from this). Once a month or so we have to review some paper or article in a critical way and I will say that it is very hard work. The thing that does strike me is that most of us pick up on the same things that the 'official' reviewer did, this is quite comforting especially if it is an area outside of ones specialist knowledge. The reason that we do this is because we are expected to publish something in out first year, already working on mine. Not easy making a watertight case that is easy to understand, is readable but also challenging. Forums are much easier as you get the feedback so much quicker when you make a mistake.:bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorjon
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2013
     
    I have at least 4 people who review my work, five if it includes something specialised like statistics or renewables (trying to keep away from this)

    I recently had papers reviewed by two academic journals: I know that there were two reviewers for each of those reviews. But the paper on Embodied Energy (a version of which is going in the GBM a bit later) had already been reviewed (and changed) by all the other members of the Institution's Sustainability panel, so when it came to review for publication, it got passed without comment. I suppose it depends on the circumstances?
    • CommentAuthorjon
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2013 edited
     
    The Stonehenge thing seems to have got to #1 in a science category on Amazon

    Very keen on seeing if anyone thinks this could help with renewables/sustainability: I still have one 'free' day left, so if anyone didn't get a kindle copy and wants one, ping me privately and I'll ping you back when it's up again?

    PS just had a Professor of Archaeology write to say that he agrees with some of the conclusions. Might start to get interesting. Didn't think it was worth bumping the thread up so have just edited this note.
    • CommentAuthorjamesingram
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2019 edited
     
    I found this old thread looking for one on green building , energy saving advice resources.
    I remember years back there being one listing lots of good website to send newbies to energy efficiency to to help them improve there homes etc .
    Anyone remember what it was called?
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