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  1.  
    I am considering a through wall letterbox as an alternative to one passing through the front door. The plan is for mail to pass through the cavity wall into an insulated box in a cupboard. A web search found various products which use a steel tunnel angled downwards between the front and rear wall. This would create a thermal bridge problem. Are there any products for this task which have better thermal efficiency and air tightness?
  2.  
    No matter what you do there will be the issue of ai tightness across whatever volume of air you have for the box. This added to the thermal bridge of the box itself

    Why not have a locked one outside?

    If you are determined a thin sheet material must be the best because of sectional area. I suspect plastic probably best
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2010
     
    Why not make the hole lining out of insulation instead of buying a steel tunnel. Cover the insulation with thin plastic or plywood to protect it?
    • CommentAuthorneelpeel
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2010
     
    What's the problem with it going through the door?

    There has to be a hole somewhere so surely better to be in an already lesser insulated part of the house?
    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeMar 29th 2010
     
    Mmm I guess my ideal would be an outside box with a little American-style flip-up flag to show "you've got mail" and a cooperative postie. Otherwise I'll be opening the outside door unecessarily to check if the post's come yet. My other idea was to tailor a rigid plastic cool-box to go on the inside door to catch the post and the draughts - like a letter cage - but insulated. Mightn't work if your door opened up hard against a wall though.
  3.  
    Would opening the door when you are urgently waiting for your mail be that much of a problem? I wouldn't have thought it would be worth going through a cavity wall for anyway? Is it April the 1st yet or am I missing somthing here?
    • CommentAuthorevan
    • CommentTimeMar 29th 2010
     
    Have you considered adding a porch? As a solution to this problem it's a bit overkill, but it adds a useful "airlock" to the house and the letterbox in the outer door can be a plain and simple one.
  4.  
    Posted By: RobinBMmm I guess my ideal would be an outside box with a little American-style flip-up flag to show "you've got mail" and a cooperative postie. Otherwise I'll be opening the outside door unecessarily to check if the post's come yet.

    I worried about this when we first moved to a house in France where the postbox was at the end of the drive on the other side of an electric gate. However, after a few weeks of adjustment I got used to just checking for mail towards the end of the afternoon or if I'd seen the postman. Anything urgent would normally require a signature & he'd ring the bell.

    If I was replacing my front door I would specify one without a letter plate & just put a steel box on the outside wall. These are available with bigger slots for small packets & separate latching doors for parcels when you're out. A porch is also useful for deliveries when you're out.

    David
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2011
     
    That looks like SPAM. Please don't drop your advertising here.
    • CommentAuthorPowerPrize
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2011 edited
     
    To DamonHD

    My honourable friend, we are allied in energy-efficiency and cutting CO2 emissions cause. However, as obsessed with "zero carbon" home as you seem to be, the funny energy-saving things you had done for your letter box are as following (cited from your website http://www.earth.org.uk/towards-a-LZC-home.html):

    • Fitted nylon-brush letterbox draught excluder for front door (~2008/05); £4 c/o Wickes.

    • Curtain for single-glazed front door and side window 2008/08/05 (with scheme to deal with letterbox and cat-flap in door); <£45 c/o John Lewis and Wilkinson.

    Is it an achievement to be proud of after new IdealGuard™ products were launched to the market in 2007?

    Are you aware that a tight letterplate flap, secondary flap or draught excluder with brush strips do not work and make things worse? Just read this (source: http://www.energysaving.co.uk/energysavingtips.htm):

    ‘Tip 10 Letter box draughts
    Letter boxes are notorious for letting in a draught. One solution is to fit brush strip over the letter box. However, the downside is that these devices make it almost impossible to push newspapers and magazines fully through. This means that you'll probably arrive home from work to find that the newspaper will be rolled up and sticking out of the letterbox, and creating a worse draught than you would have had before the brush strip was fitted. It's your call on this one.’

    Also, you have been working out how to get your family's entire home carbon-neutral and decided that it ’is tough (expensive and probably needs too much physical space)’.

    Before considering large-scale investments in energy-saving and advising complicated expensive things while being active in ‘helping small businesses and householders do their bit to combat global warming and climate change with energy efficiency,’ (source your company website: http://www.exnet.com/) a little one would have a far bigger effect. Small is beautiful.

    Kind regards
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2011 edited
     
    I am not generally commercially associated with the products I mention on my site. Advertising there of that nature if I chose to do it would be my business; here it is *not permitted*.

    You seem to apply selective and limited reading to my site: I hope your ethics are not similarly circumscribed. I have done the small and the large things to see what works and to report to others. And overall they have worked. I have put my own money and time where my mouth is.

    Please please stop apparently sleazy plugging of products which you seem to have a commercial benefit from, correct me if I'm wrong please, and obey the rules and courtesies of the venue that you are apparently abusing.

    Damon
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    Efim
    You could have a word with this site owner if you want to promote your product, I would think that he has a scale of charges and one may suit you, just ask him.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    Yup. And it's not as if the situation isn't made perfectly clear in the 'guidance' threads at the top of the 'discussions' opening page. As here...

    "GBP-Keith: Could other users please report any advertising breaches to me and I'll promptly remove and ban the offender from the forum."

    (Might also be a good time to remind posters that admin can read all whispered comments.)

    It pays to occasionally refresh one's memory with a firtle through those admin threads!
    • CommentAuthorPowerPrize
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    Sorry guys if you see it that way...

    As my records show, I have not visited this site more than just a few times. I have not used it for business. I saw people on this site asking genuine questions about letter box related problems. However, most answers they were receiving were amateurish at best or ignorant. That made me to place comments. By the way, I admit I was not aware about the 'guidance' threads.

    The danger with a number of self-proclaimed consultants is that consumers get ripped off or into trouble. Do the majority of consumers and self-proclaimed consultants know that the draught excluder with brush strips product simply makes things worse?

    As letterplates are universal in the UK, their numerous problems affect most properties. Loss of house heat and CO2 emissions are not the most dangerous ones. With multiple tragic cases of deaths and damage from the letter box crime and vandalism, such as arson and firework attacks, theft of mail, theft of car keys and access to door locks for burglary, this is another serious problem with the letter box that requires a solution. CCTV, alarms and advanced door locks cannot stop these shocking serious crimes.

    Still, eliminating the letterplate would be inappropriate. It would mean replacing the whole door. Even in newly built properties it would be inappropriate due to a certain heritage issue here. Thus, an all-embracing technical innovation had to be found.

    I felt it is important to shed some light here. All I tried to do is to point people in the right direction for their benefit. How could I do that without naming new product? What are the lengthy comments about Ecoflap, for example, if not advertising? However, virtually each time I made a comment (and I did a couple of times only) Damon springs up with condemnation.

    In the circumstances, if I were you with a family and kids, I would use this information to rush to protect your letter box for their safety and peace of mind.

    Sorry again guys, if you do not see it that way. Perhaps, strictly speaking, you have a point here, which you are ready to fight for, but Oscar Wild said "it is not necessarily true because a man dies for it."

    Kind regards
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    It is a problem determining "true" spam from the merely helpful. Personally, I would have been prepared to give PowerPrize the benefit of doubt because of the context, and it's the context that's always the rub. Compare PP's relatively harmless piece with that twat spamming screed and the difference is immediately apparent!:devil:
    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    I'm not sure why you'd make a hole in a cavity wall with a good U value, than in a door with a much poorer one?
    • CommentAuthorevan
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    To be fair, PowerPrize, whatever the guidance says, most people wouldn't have a problem if you declared your interest and explained politely why your solution might be worth paying for.

    They will have a problem with hit and run spammers dropping links.

    They will also have a problem with patronising ranting when called on it:
    "However, most answers they were receiving were amateurish at best or ignorant."
    "However, as obsessed with "zero carbon" home as you seem to be, the funny energy-saving things you had done for your letter box are as following"
    "Is it an achievement to be proud of...?"

    That's not what most would consider polite discourse, never mind effective advertising.

    Even your website doesn't seem much better in this regard, as it mentions neither a price nor a clear description of what you're selling, but basically it seems to be a variation on what RobinB suggested earlier anyway.
  5.  
    Hi,

    3 points from me

    1) We did away with the letter box entirely and have a locked box. You can lift the lid to see through the slot whether there is anything in it. We have got use to walking out to check and often forget. Post comes after we have all left for the day anyway. Post can get damp if left in there too long, particularly bills which can get left in there far too long.
    2) I think the point with mentioning the web site and then being controversial is that it’s difficult to resist having a look to see what the fuss is about. Then the web visits count shoots up which benefits the page holder as well being of interest for sponsored links. It’ll also come up on other searches as well, so I try very hard NOT to look at suspect web addresses posted by would be spammers.
    3) You could try starting a post with a declared interest without mentioning the company name. Perhaps the moderators could try goggling peoples user names to see if they come up as a company name before giving them sign on. Won’t stop the determined spammer. That said there are quite a few user names on many forums which are the company related and why not if they are contributing as many do, and I wouldn’t want to be without the contribution made here by many, if not there is a danger that it would become an amatures club. They key is blatant website /burl posting in the initial first post. The moderators could put a “potential spammer” flag on them. If they continue to contribute to meaningful discussion then fine, if not then warned/questioned.
    Cheers
    Mike up North
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    Did I not mention on another thread about a moderated page for people or products we have used and are happy with. 1 point to me if we are going down the scoring route :cool:
    Could be an invisible list until the moderator has checked out the supplier/poster.
    Would stop all the whispers of suppliers.
    It is strange that people like Kingspan and Durablock don't seem to join in on this forum, are they complacent or feel very secure?
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    HA! A lot of the big boys are aware of the annoyance spamming on forums creates and recognise it as being counter-productive. I was told that by the marketing director of a well-known maker of rooflights (not that one).

    It's difficult sometimes to not sound like one of those celebrities recently outed as subliminal touters of goods, because if you've consistently had good experiences with a particular make of something in the course of your job then you're going to sound like a merchandiser because that brand name is going to keep cropping up.

    Problems, problems. No one understands the negatives.:smoking:
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2011
     
    "There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don't know we don't know."

    And then there is marketing rhetoric.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    "Marketing rhetoric" is actually called "puff" in the trade! Trouble is, they start believing their own propaganda after a while, despite the object lesson that was Goebbels and the Nazi Party. They leave the same sort of bitter after-taste in the mouth! The only thing to get rid of that is to suck on a Jeremy Clarkson.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011 edited
     
    I like Jeremy Clarkson, he makes me giggle and those 'challenges' they do in cheap old cars put the 'need' for a Toyota Landcruiser 'because we live up a small lane and it may snow' into perspective.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    Don't make fun of the afflicted. Those Chelsea back streets can be murder. And anyway, you need a four-wheel drive to withstand the constant mounting of pavements so that you can park on double yellow lines! Do pay attention at the back.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    Big wheels are all that is needed to ride curbs, why I liked my old Beetle, could bounce over most things, just as well as it used to change direction unexpectedly on a regular basis. Rear engined piece of rubbish it was really.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    Ha! Just had the classic experience of returning home to find the hallway like a fridge. Culprit? The new telephone directory stuck in the door creating about 16 sq inches of hole to the outside -1C.

    Well, look at it this way: The clown who shoved it into the door saved a hell of a lot energy by not exerting him or herself and pushing it all the way through. It needed about a whisper of push to clear the last offending 1/4".
    • CommentAuthorpetecooper
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    Telephone directories -- now, there's an example of a waste of trees. I'm sure if they made the phone book opt-in they could print ~80% fewer copies. And don't get me started on Yellow Pages, scourge of the local authority paper recycling world...
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    Thing is, Pete, we never use them now, preferring the online one, so it goes straight into the paper recycling skip anyway.

    Does anyone know if there is any way to come off their directory list, because the same thing happens with Yellow Pages and that's a real challenge for them to get part way into the bloody hole! Well, they seem to see it that way.
    • CommentAuthorpetecooper
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    Joiner -- try here to stop 'em:

    http://www.stopjunkmail.org.uk/guide/junk_buster.php
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2011
     
    I wonder if running a laptop with a power consumption of 100W is better or worse than a telephone directory. And no justifying it by saying you have the PC (or MAC or Linux Box) on anyway.
   
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