Home  5  Books  5  Magazines  5  News  5  GreenPro  5  HelpDesk  5  Your Cart  5  Register  5  Green Living Forum
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building magazine

Green Building magazine

New - Spring 2014 edition.

View the current issue.
Subscribe now.
Magazine homepage.
Browse back issues.





Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
     
    rj, it's good news if true. There's far better, and vital, uses for biomass, than burning it, when solar is so very ample for energy production.
  1.  
    Brianwilson

    Any chance of a link to that telegraph item as I cannot seem to find it
  2.  
    Posted By: fostertomrj, it's good news if true. There's far better, and vital, uses for biomass, than burning it, when solar is so very ample for energy production.


    Our generator design incorporates solar to reduce our biomass usage similar to another Austrian CHP.
  3.  
    renewablejohn- Sorry I tried to check it out to see if could find link but failed even tried using Author name.
    It is a careers in energy supplement today with half page article headed Banking on a natural solution. One concern for me is it details another project for large plant to burn waste wood when timber waste source is dramatically reducing and it will likely divert feedstock from recycling/re-use e.g. panel manufacturers.
    Rgds
    Brian
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
     
    Gabrielle Collett-White is a freelance specialising in health issues, so what aspect of biomass was she writing about Brian?

    (I also tried googling the various permutations and got nothing of worth, apart from her specialist field, which includes an article on what to do with your bingo wings!)
  4.  
    Yes young joiner I was surprised but interesting points raised. " 2025 by then, demand for wood chips in the UK alone could almost equal the present size of the global wood-fibre biomass trade says report from the Confederation of Forest Industries" Tim Forest of Eon and Steven's Croft states " Biomass is treated the same way as coal- the skills we have built up over the past 50-60 yrs can be transferred to biomass technology quite easily". Details need for graduates including commercial graduates to deal with challenge of ensuring reliable fuel supply. Hope this gives flavour of article, wil not comment on bingo wings or lady in question as I am deep enough in the smelly material already and recognise the more I learn the less I understand in gender politics.
  5.  
    Brianwilson

    I think if you want an unbiased review of the emission reports available a good place to start is here

    http://www.biomassenergycentre.org.uk/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/BEC_TECHNICAL/RESEARCH%20AND%20STUDIES/EMISSIONS%20STUDIES/AIR%20QUALITY%20GUIDANCE.PDF
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
     
    Broken link...
  6.  
    Posted By: DamonHDBroken link...


    Your to quick for me. Link now working
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
     
    How can a report from the biomass energy centre be called unbiased?
  7.  
    Posted By: tonyHow can a report from the biomass energy centre be called unbiased?


    If you care to look its a collection of reports from around the world non of which written by the biomass energy centre.
  8.  
    renewablejohn- Tony is still correct there is basis for doubt when the reports are selected by vested interests.
    Other State sponsored reports tend to give a less rose tinted view. Having read the reports you recommend I note the general conclusion is that current biomass combustion systems need rapid upgrading in order to reduce health impact and any future proposals should be positioned to avoid local air quality degradation.
    The reports appear to confirm the use of biomass combustion requires much greater diligence than currently applied.
  9.  
    Brianwilson

    I am very impressed 28 reports in one and a half hours I cannot compete with that.
  10.  
    renewablejohn- must confess previously read a number of the reports listed over recent years. I have tried to update myself regularly particularly since UK.Gov report on comparitive emissions of coal,oil.biomass and gas published Sep 2006.
  11.  
    Solena Biofuels claim to have process that converts waste into liquid fuel that when burned produces no particulates, CO2 or sulphur dioxide (SPGV technology). Claims to be highly efficient and lower cost than incinerators. I note airlines are expressing interest for production of aviation fuel.
    Appears very interesting so raises question why is not being adopted worldwide to provide energy ?
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2011 edited
     
    And it all slips by the media!

    http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2011/01/03/qantas-solena-group-to-partner-in-aviation-biofuels-effort/

    Promising, Brian. One never knows, if they scale the plants up beyond what's needed by the airline industry (although that demand alone is eye-watering), we might get a situation similar to the one where technical advances in Formula One trickle down to the rest of the motoring industry; where one man's self-indulgence works to another man's advantage. Crumbs off the rich man's table, and all that.

    And if anyone fancies having a go themselves...

    http://www.making-biodiesel-books.com/algae-biodiesel.html

    The cost of the book is about a tank full of diesel for a large family saloon.

    And for the cost of a reasonable bottle of wine...

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Do-yourself-Guide-Biodiesel-Alternative/dp/1569756244/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1296292324&sr=8-1-fkmr0

    (The customer review for that last book is worth a read. I am not a language snob and don't pick up on the spelling of others - and a typo giggle isn't a criticism ST - but whoever wrote that review has a serious problem if English is their first language. No wonder they had a problem understanding the text of the book!)
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2011
     
    Just a passing thought, but if you factor in the tax, how would that affect the viability?

    It's has been known to kill the golden goose, although I suspect, like diesel in its early days of use for non-HGV, it'll be allowed to become established to the point of 'no real alternative' before the need to replace lost tax revenues from the displaced oil-derived fuels becomes an imperative.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2011
     
    High tax rates on products/services can be used to smooth out inflationary variability (part of the reason that the German economy seems so stable to us, but they grumble too). But there will come a time when when lost revenue becomes a problem and money has to be raised in other areas, why the community charge was introduced (oddly enough it was similar to the TEQ concept, we all get access to the same services for the same price).
    If you accept the concept of taxation (some communities don't) then the question is what is the best way to raise money, directly or indirectly, and then should there be special exemptions and should borrowing against future taxation revenue be allowed.
    And what is the cost of a tank of petrol (or diesel), varies greatly.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2011
     
    The comparison between the Community Charge and the TEQ is a good one. I think that I was the only person in Scotland who paid mine willingly. I saw lots of people around me with lots of money who wouldn't dream of paying, for all sorts of spurious self-serving reasons...

    Rgds

    Damon
  12.  
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011
     
    Groan
    Sorry, Iceland with a population of 300,000, most of whom live in one town (hardly call it a city) and have almost limitless hydro electric and geothermal energy have been banging on your at least a decade about the 'hydrogen economy' and how they will be the 'New Saudi'. Where are they, bloody nowhere.
    Now Coventry has a few hydrogen filling stations called the ' Midlands Ring'.
    We are so far off using hydrogen, they cannot even agree a safety standard for the tanks yet, fuel cells, converted ICE or a universal nozzle. Or even the best method to manufacture it.
    Long long way off.

    Now let me add to this technology
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110128165212.htm
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011
     
    Verrry, interesting.:shocked:
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011
     
    Hydrogen is a poor (density W/kg and W/l, efficiency of manufacture, safety, difficulty of containment) *store*, not in most cases a *fuel*.

    Rgds

    Damon
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011
     
    Posted By: DamonHDHydrogen is a poor (density W/kg and W/l, efficiency of manufacture, safety, difficulty of containment) *store*, not in most cases a *fuel*.

    Should that not be either J/kg or Wh/kg as it is storage really, well on planet Earth.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011
     
    Damon, you're raining on our parade.:cool:
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011 edited
     
    ST: Wh/kg and Wh/l sorry, ie energy stored per unit weight or unit volume.

    Rgds

    Damon
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2011
     
    I knew you knew really :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2011
     
    Posted By: DamonHDHydrogen is a poor (density W/kg and W/l, efficiency of manufacture, safety, difficulty of containment) *store*, not in most cases a *fuel*.

    Actually, that's not right. Hydrogen does indeed have a poor energy density (energy per unit volume) but it has the highest specific energy (energy per unit mass) of chemical fuels. It's contrary to intuition but you have to remember that hydrogen is very light! That's part of the reason that it's a very effective rocket fuel.

    Sadly, it's energy density that matters for land transport.
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press