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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorjwd
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2011
     
    Bearing in mind comments made in another post on the amazing cooling capacity of cat flaps are there any ways of getting round this problem while still allowing our furry friends access to the house?

    My current thinking (perhaps misguided) runs alongthe lines of having two flaps - one into a porch and another into the house proper to lessen the draft and trying to source a high quality cat flap (not having much luck on the last one)

    Suggestions any one?

    Jw
    •  
      CommentAuthorjonharris
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2011 edited
     
    Yes, a kind of 'air lock' chamber sounds like a decent solution. Good seals on the flaps too, with reasonable resistance to entry so they dont flap about in strong wind.
  1.  
    We have 2 cat flaps one at either side of the wall (14" thick) with a tunnel linking them, outside I've then built a wooden box with a 90degree bend in it and insulated walls... cats can use it fine, just got to stop the kids opening the doors for them!
    • CommentAuthorStuartB
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2011
     
    Your current thinking is probably best
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2011
     
    kids go through them too!!
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    tony - Big cats or very small kids? That's a hell of a cat flap!:shocked:
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    Not being funny chaps and chapesses, but can I suggest simply doing a google search? I did and got this...

    http://www.animalsource.co.uk/freecat-extended-self-lining-cat-flap---draught-proof-with-safety-lock-277-p.asp

    ...along with 162,000 other results for "draught proof cat flap".
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    You kids and your new-fangled Internet stuff Joiner...

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthoradwindrum
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    That cat flap is your bog standard draught proof one...they aint. They get stuck slightly open, the seals are next to useless, and its the toing and froing that keeps the air flowing in thats the main problem. as for U-values!!!!
    I reckon the idea through a wall with twin flaps is best - with the 90degree bend as well!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    I cant see the purpose of a bend?
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    Posted By: tony. I cant see the purpose of a bend?

    To fool the neighbourhood Tom?? ( sorry Tom Foster not you):bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    Adam - was just an example of what's out there.:bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011 edited
     
    Would it ever be worth having a seperate in-flap and out-flap, perhaps side by side? It's the lack of overlap on a door that has to swing both ways that makes them so hard to draughtproof.
    These would be easy to insulate and seal with magnetic tape or similar. As long as your cat is strong enough to push it's way in/out!
    If I ever get the urge to butcher our back door in that way I'll post a photo.
    RobinB
  2.  
    The bend was an attempt to stop direct blasts of cold air. Probably doesn't actually make much difference
    • CommentAuthoradwindrum
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    I guess you dont get porches with 90 degree bends but it would stop prevailing winds, as I mentioned they often get stuck slightly ajar so any straight runs with prevailing wind would push right through. My flap takes more of a beating though as its a terrier.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2011
     
    Our porch (and all originals in the surrounding identikit estate) have such as 90-degree arrangement, and I'm fairly sure it does reduce the howling gale effect.

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthorAds
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2011
     
    Whilst not yet available, Richard Jessell, the inventor of the draught-proof letter box ('Ecoflap'), originally worked on a pet flap and having spoken with him have found that his 'Petway' should be coming to fruition over the next year or so - see www.petway.co.uk

    I have no connection with Richard, other than as a potential customer.
  3.  
    Hi,

    Bringing this old thread back to life to see if anyone has any suggestions on the best cat flap to buy?

    I am building a new house and have the ability to put in either a through the wall or more conventional door cat flap. (I don't know if this makes any difference.) We would also like one which has a microchip reader so that only our cat can get into the house.

    Thanks,
    Richard
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2014
     
    I would be far more concerned about the draughts and lac of insulation that these things bring. Will the new house be well insulated and air tight.

    I designed out a letter plate on my house as it proved impossible to get an air tight and sufficiently well insulated one.

    Could you have two, one into a storm porch, then another into the house, even if it was only a cat storm porch/air lock that might do the trick. Microchip ones are best to keep out interlopers.
  4.  
    At Ecobuild this company was showing a Passive House certified range of pet doors.

    http://petwalk.at/

    £1300 (!)
    • CommentAuthordb8000
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2014
     
    Richard, we have a sureflap microchip reader.
    it has lasted 4 years well and resists stronger cats trying to break in. It has just developed an intermittent fault but we'd get another.
    there wasn't much choice on the market when we bought it.
    cheers
    Dave.
  5.  
    @tony - I am concerned about air tightness and lack of insulation. I don't have a porch, but have quite a thick all construction so might see what would be possible to have a cat sized air lock somewhere.

    @Simon - looks good but expensive. As my partner wants the cat I might get her to buy it!

    @db8000 - thanks for recommending a more reasonably priced version
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2014
     
    I've built a box/tunnel into the wall. I haven't yet decided what to put into it, but I can just block it up to start with. I didn't want to go cutting holes into my brand new and very expensive back door!

    Be sure to look at the size of those Austrian units before deciding what to do. A couple of other products you might want to look at are:

    http://energyefficientdogdoors.com/Insulated-Cat-Door & http://energyefficientdogdoors.com/air-infiltration-testing

    http://www.idealpetproducts.com/ruff.php
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2014
     
    Posted By: Simon StillAt Ecobuild this company was showing a Passive House certified range of pet doors.

    http://petwalk.at/" rel="nofollow" >http://petwalk.at/

    £1300 (!)



    Bl**+- He** Fire!! :shocked::sad:
    cheaper to leave the hole in the wall and turn the heating up. :wink:
  6.  
    @djh - I had found that US website. The door is a bit ugly, but in terms of performance of air tightness it sounds like exactly what I want. The only downside is that it doesn't have a micro chip reader as far as I can tell.

    How long is the box tunnel you have built? My wall construction is going to be a face brick, air gap, insulation, breeze block (300 - 325mm). I'm not sure if that would be appropriate?
  7.  
    @djh - I assume you'd have a cat flap at either end of the tunnel? I've just been having a look at the Sureflap and there is only one door, so I guess I would have to put one at either end of the tunnel.

    I've never had a cat before so am all a bit lost on this subject.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2014
     
    Posted By: richardelliot@djh - I assume you'd have a cat flap at either end of the tunnel? I've just been having a look at the Sureflap and there is only one door, so I guess I would have to put one at either end of the tunnel.

    I don't know. With a traditional cat flap you can just have one door and leave the other end of the tunnel open. So it depends how keen you are on airtightness and insulation. The Canadian product - Ideal's Ruff door - is designed to have an airspace between the two flaps. I don't think I'd try to put two Sure Flaps in - the need to access them to change batteries makes it a bit awkward. But maybe a Freedom pet Pass at one end to get the airtightness and a Sure Flap at the other for access control could be made to work.

    Whether you need a chip reader at all is going to depend on where you live and how your cat reacts to other cats - does it defend its territory or invite them in for lunch? Manual control of in-only, out-only, closed or fully open is definitely essential though.
    • CommentAuthordb8000
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2014
     
    You only need one lockable one. Put a cheap one on the outside to help cut down on drafts.
  8.  
    Revolving cat-door?
    Down-draught heater like shops?
   
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