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  1.  
    I'm in the process of installing internal insulation to a solid-walled Victorian house; this raises a few concerns about dampness in timbers that are on the outside of the insulation layer, principally the joist ends which pass through the insulation and sit into the brickwork. I am doing everything I can to avoid condensation risk and providing ventilation etc but while the joist ends are exposed it seems prudent to apply some timber preservative to them just to be safe.

    From what I can see the only kind of treatment really considered ok in 'green' terms is boron-based. There seem to be various products out there; can anyone recommend what I should be looking for, for preventative treatment of old (>100 yr) timbers?

    I've seen comment that a problem with boron is that it isn't fixed in the timber like other chemicals and can tend to leach out. If the joists are sitting on (hopefully not but possibly) slightly damp brickwork is this something I should worry about?

    Any advice gratefully received!
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2011
     
    lime mortar and lime render or pointing will keep them dry.

    dry wood dont rot or get attacked by worm
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2011
     
    Try searching for "dry rot barrier paint". Dry rot spores can lay dormant waiting for humidity to rise, the spores can also travel accross other non-timber surfaces.
    Mike
  2.  
    Posted By: tonylime mortar and lime render or pointing will keep them dry.

    dry wood dont rot or get attacked by worm


    The brickwork is already pointed with cement render (as far as I can tell).

    I will get it repointed eventually, but even then I will be nervous about the brickwork being damper than it would be with heat from inside to drive it out. As the joist ends are currently exposed, and it would be easy to do, it seems sensible to treat them as a safety measure. I don't feel that the long term effects of internally insulating solid brickwork are sufficiently well understood to take the risk.
    • CommentAuthorseanie
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2011
     
    You can get boron rods; drill a hole and insert.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2011
     
    I'm sure I must have one of those: I can bore for England... %-P
    • CommentAuthorlineweight
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2011
     
    Well, after looking into the options I think I'm going to go for this -

    http://www.agwoodcare.co.uk/prod/probor_50.html

    same idea as the rods suggested above but works out cheaper. Seems more suited to long-term preventative treatment than a surface painted-on type solution.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2011
     
    I would have preferred the use of boron rods...

    http://www.boron.org.uk/boron_gel_paste_rods.htm

    Which are also available from here...

    http://www.greenbuildingstore.co.uk/page--boron-timber-preservatives.html

    Try as I might, I cannot for the life of me think of the name of the small wood treatment pellets that you install into 8mm holes drilled at regular intervals which, if touched by damp, release a chemical hardening product that stops the damp. I've still got a couple of packs somewhere, but I'm buggered if I can find them in the "reorganisation" that followed the move of my gear from the old to the new workshop here!

    The advantage over the surface treatments is that they stay in place and will do so for many years, reacting only if a problem occurs.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2011
     
    Just found those treatment pellets! 'Ronseal Wood Preservative Tablet', but cannot find them in a google search.

    This is what they look like: [IMG]http://i54.tinypic.com/2rysjzl.jpg[/IMG]
    • CommentAuthorlineweight
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2011
     
    Hm, they look easier to install than the paste, which was a bit messy and time consuming, but ok.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2011
     
    After extensive searching, including Ronseal's own site, I now suspect that those preservative tablets have been withdrawn from the market. Wonder why?

    Cue onimous music.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2011
     
    too toxic
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2011
     
    Do they cure headaches as well as being a dessert topping and floor wax?

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2011
     
    they cure all ills permanently
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2011
     
    Except broken bones:wink:
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2011 edited
     
    Pity, they were bloody useful and very effective.

    What was toxic in them, Tony?

    Can't remember any warnings on the packaging.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2011
     
    I think it was an organometalic compound like tbt or a phosphorous one possibly not on the tin as a trade secret.

    Long ago I saw some preservative plugs that killed dry rot, wet rot etc but they caused health problems for the operatives and were either banned or withdrawn before they got banned.

    Organometallic compounds are good at killing or interfering with natural things and are orders of magnitude more toxic than the metal.

    I now prefer to keep wood dry and it does not rot then.

    I can put up a picture of an over spanned wood lintels several thousand years old carrying a stone portico with no rot in them yet.
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2011
     
    Hope those bloody customers don't read this thread then!

    Probably dropping like flies.

    Wonder if I could sue Ronseal for my heart problems? A bit chancy to try blaming the hernia on the stuff, I suppose?
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2011
     
    Are they very heavy? B^>

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthorJoiner
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2011
     
    :bigsmile:
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2011
     
    What, the flies? not usually
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