Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


powered by Surfing Waves




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




    • CommentAuthorwookey
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2011
     
    I'm interested in investing in green energy (in that if I'm investing at all, e.g. via pension, I'd prefer that money to be used on renewable energy projects, than oil drilling, or landmine production). So far I've missed deadlines for Ecobonds and Ovesco.

    I just came across: 'rebonds' https://rebonds.equiniti.com/ . It's much the same as Ecobonds, but run by 'Wind Prospects' rather than ecotricity. I've never heard of them, but hey claim to have been around for 15 years. Invest between £500 and £10,000 directly in an un-guaranteed bond at 7.5%.

    Anyone else have any evidence to show that this is genuine good people and not an elaborate boiler-room scam?
    The info they provide looks convincing to me.

    Are there other renewable energy funds small investors can access? Jermome a Paris has talked about the millions that banks have put into various offshore wind projects, so there is clearly heavy investment going on, but I have no idea which funds that is coming from and how one chooses to put ones own money there (and gain some of the benefit). The 'ecology' funds I have looked at are full of nonsense that I don't find very interesting, or aren't very 'ecological' and often mostly comprise a long list of things they won't invest in. That's OK, but I'm more interested in energy policy and building refurbishment than ethical treatment of animals and the like.
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2011
     
    If I were you I would go for FITs and buy some solar panels -- guaranteed for 25 yrs likely about 10% return
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2011
     
    There's another Ecotricity EcoBond round coming up this tax year according to Dale Vince in the last few days.

    Ovesco and Stockport Hydro are still looking for some top-up investment AFAIK.

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2011 edited
     
    Initially I thought ReBonds were regular corporate bonds but it seems that's not the case. Most corporate bonds can be traded. These seem to be a very different beast according to..

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2011/jun/18/wind-power-bonds-green-energy

    <blockquote>The invitation document states: "It will not be possible to sell or realise ReBonds … [they] are an unsecured debt of the company, and there is no certainty or guarantee that [it] will be able to repay them </blockquote>
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2011
     
    Here is another one for solar..

    http://www.eqmaglive.com/index.php?option=com_multicategories&view=article&id=1671:sag-solarstrom-ag-issues-75-corporate-bond-to-finance-further-growth&catid=97:europe&Itemid=157

    This one trades on the German market which means you can buy and sell at any time. The market price will most likely vary depending on interest rates until the maturity date. As rates stand I would expect them to start trading above face value. However if rates shot up to say 10% then they would trade at less then face value until maturity date. Looks like the initial placing closes very soon.

    The above is not financial advice!
  1.  
    Triodos Renewables is about to have another share issue:

    http://www.triodos.co.uk/en/personal/investments/renewables/overview/

    Again, a slightly different form of investment. Take particular note of How to buy and sell shares. I am not a financial adviser and have a modest investment in Triodos Renewables.
  2.  
    Posted By: john_connettTriodos Renewablesis about to have another share issue:

    http://www.triodos.co.uk/en/personal/investments/renewables/overview/

    Again, a slightly different form of investment. Take particular note ofHow to buy and sell shares. I am not a financial adviser and have a modest investment in Triodos Renewables.


    I went off Triodos whilst looking to finance my WES 30 250kw wind turbine. To be told by Triodos that they dont invest in wind of less than 1MW was a bit of a shock as to me a project costing 500k is quite substantial. I wonder why we still bank with them as they also refused to support Biomass in UK although they do support biomass in the Netherlands.

    Wookey

    If you care for a direct investment in a wind turbine at 7.5% I am always open to offers.
    • CommentAuthorneelpeel
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2011 edited
     
    Just thought it might be worth pointing out that the closing date for Ecobond 2 is 16th December.

    http://www.ecotricity.co.uk/about-ecotricity/ecobonds

    By the way I have no affiliation to Ecotricity. Just that, similar to Wookey, if I'm investing anyway then I'd rather it was into an ethical, 'green' investment rather than into the vast array of morally bankrupt global corporations.
    • CommentAuthorwookey
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     
    Last day for ecobonds, if you were meaning to do something about it (closes 6pm Friday 16th). We had to use post in the end as the online setup refused our debit card repeatedly. Hopefully it'll have got there in time.
    • CommentAuthorwookey
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011 edited
     
    Oops - posted in wrong forum, so nonsequitur deleted.

    I don't actually have anything useful to say, except perhaps pondering if renewablejohn has got any further with his scheme yet.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     
    Managed to just squeeze in a minimum Ecotricity Ecobond investment online... My debit card had more luck that wookey's. Closes this pm as w said.

    Rgds

    Damon
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     
    Hi Damon,
    I just looked at these for my partner for long term. I got the rather tart reply that these give 6% and you can get 10-12% on preferential shares. I can't put them in my ISA, but may be worth putting in a SIPP. Have I missed something?
    •  
      CommentAuthorDamonHD
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     
    Had I been able to hold these in my Hargreaves Lansdown SIPP I'd have been able to put a lot more cash in, but HL won't touch them. I did escalate at HL and forwarded the response to DV himself in the hope that EcoBonds3 can be more SIPP-friendly (listed, tradeable, with an information feed that HL can use to track them.)

    If you're an Ecotricity customer you get an extra 0.5% on the bond's rate IIRC.

    You can invest in all sorts of things to get a better rate such as, I should think, blood diamonds, tobacco, and credit-derivatives, but the risk attached to the EcoBonds should be low and the funding is direct capex for new renewable generation, which is hard to beat from a 'usefulness' pov I think.

    Rgds

    Damon

    PS. As ever I think I have to point out that though in the financial industry I am not authorised to give investment advice, and indeed you'd quite possibly be a fool to use me as an advisor...
  3.  
    I would have stated (not suggested) PV panels and the FITS but now might be worth waiting with what happens with the legal challenges to the governments 50% rate cut. If you have a good location and a decent installation price it's now a modest (3-5% at a guestimate) but longer term solid investment
    I would also suggest Tridos bank.
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2011
     
    "Green Investments?"
    I suppose you really have to define Green. Its easy to lump any company that doesn't produce renewable energy or turn rubbish into methane as being beyond the pale but there are many good, well run manufacturing companies, investing, and trying hard in difficult circumstances. Is there a database anywhere?
    • CommentAuthorwookey
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2012
     
    No mention of Drumlin Wind Co-operative, being organised by Energy4All?

    Extended (twice) deadline is the 30th Nov (i.e Friday). Put your £250-£20,000 in sharpish if you want a share.

    Seems a good project, although I only have the share prospectus and websites to go on. Not much technical detail.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbetterroof
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2012
     
    There's a few small projects around the country - we have a local one called MORE (MOrecambe bay community REnewables). Just doing PV at the mo with one 50KWp installation, looking at another at the moment.

    http://www.morerenewables.co.uk/
    • CommentAuthorwookey
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2012
     
    Drumlin offer extended to 21st Dec as money is still coming in (they've now got some of mine) and they almost have enough (2.3 million so far) for all 5 of the turbines they have permission for. http://www.drumlin.coop/home.asp

    Any others currently open?
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2013
     
    I was just looking at the Green coat uk wind fund which has the 'benefit' of being listed so you can get your cash back at market rate.

    I like the fact that the fund is over 5 wind farms so (aside from government policy) the risk should be spread a little.

    Is there anything similar I should look into or any downside of this fund I should be aware of?
    • CommentAuthordickster
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2013
     
    Put your money into the Ecology Building Soc.? Poor but safe investment and you'll help to build houses like mine, which is quite eco.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2013
     
    I believe Green Coat own part of the Braes of Doune wind farm. Perhaps see this report "Environmental issues at the Braes of Doune wind farm” before you decide if it's the sort of project you want to support.

    http://docs.wind-watch.org/philips-environmentalissuesbraesdoune.pdf
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2013
     
    Do you have any impartial links with any sense of perspective?
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2013
     
    I would have been surprised if a such a massive construction project didn't create silt in run off water.
    • CommentAuthorCWatters
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013 edited
     
    So it's ok then?

    The author "founded and directed The Heather Trust which specialises in the management and rehabilitation of heather moor and peatland"

    http://www.heathertrust.co.uk/

    "The Heather Trust recognises the importance of multiple land use and seeks to work with all sectors, including sporting interests, farming, forestry and conservation. The Trust helps to highlight the valuable natural services that well managed uplands and moorland areas can provide, which include the provision of high quality drinking water and the storage of carbon in peat to reduce the influence that greenhouse gasses have on climate change."

    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013
     
    Posted By: CWattersSo it's ok then?
    No, but... Only read the first few pages of introduction but it gave me very little idea of the relative scale of the problem compared with the effects of other methods of obtaining similar amounts of energy. I'm with jms452 on the need for perspective.
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013
     
    Posted By: CWattersSo it's ok then?


    Its not that its 'OK'. Its that an organisation that claims 'wind power has and will ever have only the most minimal ability to mitigate the human causes of global warming' is bound to think that wind turbines are not worth any disruption. i.e. their entire premise is flawed.

    Being against things without proposing an alternative is effectively campaigning for business as usual and the consequential environmental damage that occurs as a result of this. If there was a organisation that agreed with the premise but acted against the worst money grabbing developers I'd be all for it. The closest we seem to have to that is the RSPB - cue vitriolic hatred from the anti windfarm crowd.

    I used to be agnostic about wind until a local farmer proposed a 5x2.5MWp windfarm near us and I saw first hand the level of the tactics used against it. The small anti windfarm group set about claiming to speak for all locals. Any locals who actually agreed with the proposal were ran out of town (literally in one case). Pro-turbine posters (placed equally legally under the anti ones) were ripped down and the residents posting them abused. Neighboring Councillors who didn't oppose the development were vilified and accused of being undemocratic by antis posing as their constituents. I won't even go into what I will call 'misrepresented' statistics in statements in published by the local papers.

    You could say that I am now somewhat skeptical of anything coming out of windwatch and for every anti campaign I hear about I now wonder how many people who didn't tow the line where hounded, threatened and abused.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013
     
    If we based decision making on kg CO2/(year.MWh) rather than nominal cash, does anyone think that we would get a different viewpoint?
    • CommentAuthorjms452
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013
     
    Took me a while to work out your units :bigsmile:

    In my view it needs some form of capital cost in there too. i.e
    (KgCO2/year)/(installed cost of MWh)
    and that's before lifetime and maintenance are included.

    Going for (mainly) onshore wind was implicitly aiming to maximize this (i.e. most low carbon electricity generated per pound invested).
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013 edited
     
    Trouble is as soon as you put in a cash value you really need to put a cash value on the CO2e.
    Then you have to factor in fluctuating currencies, differing global rates for materials, labour and natural assets as well as economic growth/population growth, then expected life of assets and future value of disposal and replacement, all gets very messy and probably why it is not really a good system to compare technologies.
    Sticking to SI units is so simple in comparison.
    • CommentAuthorEd Davies
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013
     
    I still haven't worked out ST's units. Why not kg CO₂/MWh? Where does the year bit come from?
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press