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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

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    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2014
     
    Shocked to see I first posted this in 2011 and I've still not got an e-bike. Was in China last month and saw just how many e-bikes/scooters are in use there. I am definitely getting one this summer. Any new suggestions?
    thanks
    RobinB
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2014
     
    I went down this route.
    http://electricmountainbikes.blogspot.co.uk/2008/04/heinzmann-electric-bikes.html

    I bought a standard Dawes hybrid bike and then had a front wheel motor conversion, I kept the old one for future return to non-electric, fitted the battery pack and away you go, it was dead easy.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2014
     
    That Dawes costs more than my car is worth!!
    • CommentAuthorowlman
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2014
     
    Posted By: SteamyTea............. than my car is worth!!


    Your car must be like my old Transit was. 2Litre petrol engine, drove it for 6 years, bodywork was rotten and I still managed to get over £1100 for it; scrappy said he'd give me £100. The London lads were queuing up to buy and rebuild because of it being petrol and the LEZ.
  1.  
    Any up to date suggestions?

    Or best wheel conversion kit?
  2.  
    There are some great E-bikes around now but as with anything, quality costs, and if you compare a brand new bike to the cost of an old banger they're going to look expensive compared to a car.

    Central motors ride better than hubs, the power and reliability of disc brakes suit the extra weight of an ebike. Good quality integrated lights are reliable and don't get knocked or wires caught. All add cost though.

    This is my current favourite - Tern GSD. Same length as a standard bike but can carry two adults or adult plus TWO children in child seats (and still have luggage on a huge front 'pizza' rack') or masses of luggage. Watch the video - it's a great piece of design. One size fits all, Folds for storage, even stands on it's end. Yes, it's over £4000 with all the options but it could genuinely replace a car and it's built with quality parts and should hold it's value.
    https://www.ternbicycles.com/bikes/471/gsd

    Moustache Lundi looks well made, integrated lights, solid mudgaurds and a hub gear (which make a lot of sense on a utility bike). http://ebiketips.road.cc/content/reviews/electric-city-bikes/moustache-lundi-26-alfine-274
  3.  
    I've had a brief ride on a Moustache Lundi and it was very nice. I was initially surprised how heavy the bike was (probably shouldn't have been when it has a motor and a battery). It took more force than a regular bike to do the first quarter / half turn of the peddle and then the electric motor kicked in for assistance.

    I read that the key thing to look out for was the electrical components with Bosch and Yamaha being the best.

    I'm currently idly looking at a Cube bike which has all Bosch components. Cube and Raleigh seem to be the best value bikes with all Bosch / Yamaha components?
  4.  
    >>I was initially surprised how heavy the bike was (probably shouldn't have been when it has a motor and a battery). It took more force than a regular bike to do the first quarter / half turn of the peddle and then the electric motor kicked in for assistance.

    Yes, motor and battery adds a chunk of weight and step through utility bikes are already heavy. Shouldn't be hard to start off - i know it's obvious but did you remember to change gears? I've forgotten a few times when i've ridden e-bikes. On a conventional bike it's immediately apparent but on an ebike you can get away with it but it's tough until the motor kicks. Much less strain on you and the bike if you drop it into a nice low gear for setting off.

    https://www.raleigh.co.uk/captus-low-step-hub-gear-black-20154 looks a very good spec for the money. Cube bikes are usually very good value for money and good quality but i don't know their e-bike range
  5.  
    Posted By: Simon Stilli know it's obvious but did you remember to change gears?


    I have to admit I paid no attention to the gears when I set off. Someone kindly lent me their bike so I just jumped onto it and went. Next time I try one I'll pay more attention to the gears.
  6.  
    Simon what about kits?

    I quite fancy turning my 20yr old Raleigh Max into electric....
  7.  
    Sorry, know nothing about kits. I’m guessing they’re mostly a replacement front wheel and a battery.

    Front wheel hub drive seems the simplest/cheapest but worst way to power a bike - least rider on that wheel so potentially less grip (though i suppose the motor hub adds a load of weight). Certainly its not the route chosen by any of the quality complete bikes.
    • CommentAuthorMikC
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2018
     
    Posted By: VictorianecoSimon what about kits?

    I quite fancy turning my 20yr old Raleigh Max into electric....

    You want to head over to the pedelcs forum I think. A ton of info over there on kits.

    http://www.pedelecs.co.uk
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