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  1.  
    Posted By: renewablejohnAs for comments of extractors interfering with the woodstove I thought GBF posters where wiser than that with sealed buildings and woodstoves with external air supplies.

    Please don't confuse wood stoves with external air supplies and room sealed wood stoves. External air supply wood stoves can be (probably will be) affected by extractors whereas room sealed wood stoves probably won't be. (until you open the door to reload) It all depends on the negative pressure created by the extractor.

    Back to Mikes (the OP) problem, I would expect that putting a filter on the neighbours chimney will make no difference what so ever as evidence as reported here would indicate that the neighbour has no interest in behaving responsibly and so the only solution IMO would be a passive fix i.e. one that works by design without any operational intervention by the owner.
  2.  
    Posted By: Peter_in_Hungary
    Posted By: renewablejohnAs for comments of extractors interfering with the woodstove I thought GBF posters where wiser than that with sealed buildings and woodstoves with external air supplies.

    Please don't confuse wood stoves with external air supplies and room sealed wood stoves. External air supply wood stoves can be (probably will be) affected by extractors whereas room sealed wood stoves probably won't be. (until you open the door to reload) It all depends on the negative pressure created by the extractor.

    Back to Mikes (the OP) problem, I would expect that putting a filter on the neighbours chimney will make no difference what so ever as evidence as reported here would indicate that the neighbour has no interest in behaving responsibly and so the only solution IMO would be a passive fix i.e. one that works by design without any operational intervention by the owner.


    Peter

    The reason I said wiser was because I thought it was a no go having an extractor in the same room as a woodstove. Certainly with a Dunsley your not allowed to put an extractor in the same room as the woodstove.
    As for Mikee I believe your right unless Mikee has control of the filter. Dont think there is a passive fix for someone determined to burn rubbish.
  3.  
    Posted By: renewablejohnDont think there is a passive fix for someone determined to burn rubbish.

    The passive fix would be a chimney that carried the emissions up and away (OK to dispurse and pollute, diluted, elsewhere - no different to any other stove) and this IMO can only be acheived by increasing the height until the problem is solved - or stop using the stove.


    Posted By: renewablejohnThe reason I said wiser was because I thought it was a no go having an extractor in the same room as a woodstove.

    Same applies over here, although over here it is not the same room but the same air space and an internal door is not counted as separating the air space
    • CommentAuthorMikeee5
    • CommentTime2 days ago edited
     
    I've got to finalise the agreement shortly. The brickwork to the stack is in poor condition! Would it be aceptable for a bricklayer to state if the existing chimney is in a substantial enough condition to take the weight of an extra meter of brickwork or should this be done by a specialist structural enginneer?

    I also have a chance to alter the wording of the agreement. Has anyone got any suggestions regarding a Claus in the event the recommendations do not solve the problem? Unfortunately I don't have any other option than to sign the agreement.

    Thank you for your continued support.

    Mikeee5
  4.  
    An experienced bricklayer should be able to say if it is possible to add an extra 1m of brickwork to the chimney BUT they will not be insured to make that decision and if anything happens in the next storm - good luck with getting any damages!

    A structural engineer should pass their opinion in writing, especially if there is any chance of any of the chimney landing on your property. If the chimney looks doubtful I would expect the structural engineer to state that the chimney should be taken down to good brickwork, probably below roof line and rebuilt. I would not be surprised if they also specified a reinforced render to be applied

    I would also expect the requirement that the chimney should be lined (if it does not already have one) as the additional height will cause additional cooling (due to extra exposure to cold) and this could cause condensates to precipitate out causing chimney blockage or reduced performance.

    If you are forced to sign the agreement you should IMO insist on wording such as

    In the event that the proposed extension to the chimney by 1m fails to fully and completely resolve the problem of nuisance emissions from the chimney in question then this agreement will become null and void
  5.  
    Think you need to include a clause to state what monitoring device is installed with the proposed chimney and in the event that a pre-determined improvement is not reached then the electrostatic filter will be installed into the new chimney extension again monitored so that you know whether they switch the filter on or not.
  6.  
    Posted By: renewablejohnThink you need to include a clause to state what monitoring device is installed with the proposed chimney and in the event that a pre-determined improvement is not reached then the electrostatic filter will be installed into the new chimney extension again monitored so that you know whether they switch the filter on or not.

    I would not want to give them any suggestion of putting up a solution that may work if they switch it on but makes no difference to the problem if the item is switched off or not maintained. (A bit too much like the VW diesel emissions testing for my liking)

    IMO what is needed is a chimney that works on its own (or a stove that isn't used)
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