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    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    I think I use way too much energy in my house, but had no idea how I compare to my neighbours. So decided, while they are out, to read their meters (we are all electric and the houses are the same size, though one is the end of terrace with the main wall NW facing, they get the larger garden though).
    The occupancy is as follows:
    House A (the end of terrace one), two adults, 1 small child, grandparents often do daycare.
    House B (mine) usually occupied all day, one disabled person and me, tight with the heating.
    House C Two adults, both working, one only mornings

    Last 24 hours energy use:

    House A 55 kWh
    House B 11 kWh
    House C 22 kWh

    I suspect that A and B have their heating on.
    • CommentAuthorjamesingram
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012 edited
     
    i read my tennants meter on my old flat last week for the first time in since we moved out , stuck the figures in imeasure and the flat still coming up A+ , usage was up slighlty on previous average. interesting to see the improvement I made on the flat still hold true with a different occupier ( though i beleive they are also happy with an indoor temperature of around 19o C , many customers I work for average around the 21o C level on the stat.
    Be interesting to see how energy efficient properties such as the SSE test project in Slough
    ( Greenwatts way, I think) perform with different occupants , I'll see if there's any info published on tinternet.

    http://www.ssezerocarbonhomes.com/
    • CommentAuthorMikel
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    We live in the country with our nearest neighbour about 40 metres away and the houses are all different. So, comparisons are not worthwhile.

    However, I do record our electricity consumption twice a day, around 8am and 5pm in Winter and about 7-8pm in summer. We have oiled-fired central heating, which is on most evenings now. There are two of us at home all day and we have a 4 bed bungalow.

    Average daily (24hr) consumption of electricity:

    Summer (May-Sept 2011) 8.6kwh
    Winter (Oct-Mar 2011/2) 11.6kwh (3.84kw PV installed 4/10/2011)
    Summer (Apr-Sept 2012) 4.6kwh (note the drop in consumption from previous summer. The PV is doing something)
    Winter (Oct- to date) 9.2kwh

    Mike
  1.  
    Hi,
    I am looking after someones mid terrace house while they are in hospital(plus two dogs and five chickens). I did start to get worried with a few frosty nights and his bathroom being built on the back - he has no central heating. But the house does not feel cold. I assume his neighbours houses are keeping it warm with the two great hunking party walls acting as low temperature emmitters. I wonder how much heat he "benefits" from if his room temperature is a few degrees lower than his neighbours :bigsmile:

    Hi Steamy looks like you have good neighbours subsidising you haeting costs:wink:

    Richard
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    They may be subsiding mine, but it makes no difference to national usage.
    I may have to turn my heating on soon though, it is getting a bit silly. Trouble is the main room I use is easy to heat with a fan heater/fridge and the cooker, the rest of the house is chilly.
    I shall try and keep an eye on what my neighbours use, may even ask them. Trouble is if they say no, and then they catch me at it.
    • CommentAuthorsnyggapa
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    used to have a housemate who insisted on keeping the flat at 21 degrees

    The solution, oddly enough, was calibrating the thermostat down a couple of degrees so what showed as 21 was really 19 (although I have no idea of accuracy, it could have been 20 in reality) . this was a digital stat and it actually had a calibration menu :)

    The point being the need to set the stat to 21 was behavioral rather than based upon need for that temperature...
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    a good thirty percent of my usage was saved by changing behaviour. I still struggle with my lodgers behaviour, but she is a special case (only a third of her brain works). Trouble is now it is getting towards the technological fixes as I have done the easy stuff, but have saved around 50% in total.
    • CommentAuthorskyewright
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012 edited
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeaTrouble is now it is getting towards the technological fixes as I have done the easy stuff, but have saved around 50% in total.

    I thought we'd probably just about run out of savings at around 7.5kWh/day but with the latest change (1 big and fast but efficient computer using virtual machines doing the jobs of 3 older slower & less efficient ones) we managed to average a usage (not import) of less than 6kWh per day for the first time last month.
    That's down from 12-13kWh/day back in 2008-9.
    2 adults, at home most of the time.
    N.B. excluding heating, of course...

    PS. The downside of the computer change is that without the saved watts I'm definitely going to need a heater on more often in my office this winter...

    Already got the thick socks & fibrepile. :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorMikel
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    In terms of electrical usage, our biggest consumers are the electric cooker and tumble dryer. The weather is the big problem when it comes to the tumble dryer. Not enough dry and breezy days.

    Cooking requires a change from using the oven to the hob or the slow cooker as it is getting too cold for salads.

    We have changed about about 40 50w halogens for 4w LEDs but we are still left with the living room lit by 33 10/20w G4 bulbs. I haven't seen any decent living room LED lighting, at least, not down here in Cornwall.

    We are also exploring changing our heating system from oil but that will be expensive.

    I really don't see how many householders will be able to modify their houses and replace their electrical goods with low energy options without spending a significant amount of capital.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    Posted By: skyewrightvirtual machines doing the jobs of 3 older slower & less efficient ones
    Wish I had thought of thatm a quarter of my use is the PCs. Still Got a lad working on the RPi so that will help, may get it back son for testing as it is going out as part of my ResM project.

    Posted By: Mikeltumble dryer
    Posted By: MikelNot enough dry and breezy days
    Posted By: Mikeldown here in Cornwall
    I manage it, but usually in to go out and get it when it rains. Raining now.

    Posted By: MikelWe have changed about about 40 50w halogens for 4w LEDs
    I decided not to go down this route, but have changed from 20W, to 11W and now to 8W CFL and really do not have a problem, and I have very strange eyesight since my cataracts were drilled out and replaced with shiny bits of plastic without any UV filtering. I actually find the blueness of some LED quite painful. I changed the lodgers 11W to an 8W last week and she has not said anything, 2 quid each from MacSalvers.

    Posted By: MikelI really don't see how many householders will be able to modify their houses and replace their electrical goods with low energy options without spending a significant amount of capital.
    Think that is where I am now, could save a tiny bit on the fridge, not sure about the washing machine, 30 kg of water heated to 40°C is the same with any machine. ST is my best option for water heating, that would save quite a bit, but not really worth the expense on this house at the moment as I want to move.
    • CommentAuthorTriassic
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012 edited
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeaI still struggle with my lodgers behaviour, but she is a special case (only a third of her brain works). Trouble is now it is getting towards the technological fixes as I have done the easy stuff, but have saved around 50% in total.


    What exactly are you up to with her brain?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    :bigsmile:
    I keep it in a jar in the fridge until she is going to be sensible and grown-up about it. Better get a back-up generator. :cool:

    It is tricky when dealing with disabled people, think we have done this elsewhere. I can understand that with one side paralysed that showering is a bit hard, but not 'till all the hot water has gone' hard.:devil:
    • CommentAuthorborpin
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2012
     
    What I think this demonstrates yet again is that until energy pricing is such that, unless there are special circumstances, energy should be charged on a scale such that the more you use the greater the cost per unit. Those who can afford it, waste energy the most.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2012
     
    What I did notice on their meters is that it shows the rates they are paying and what the meter rental is. They are all on the same deal as me, the EDF standard E7. That only has a day and a night rate. It is only recently that they stopped the unit breaks and replaced them with meter rental. We are all paying 6p at night and 16 p during the day.
    Thing is for us to change to gas would cost several thousand pounds each just for connection, then several thousand pounds for central heating/hot water systems to be fitted. And all that for a saving of about 15p a day, just does not make sense but does mean that we are at the mercy of the electricity companies.
    I will probably not be reading their meters till next week now, unless everyone goes out :wink:
    • CommentAuthorrhamdu
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2012
     
    Did anyone else see this? '9 out of 10 households to ration energy use this winter' http://www.uswitch.com/gas-electricity/news/2012/10/23/9-in-10-households-to-ration-energy-use-this-winter/

    The word 'ration' makes you think of wartime, hardship, disaster. If they had said 'manage' it would not have been much of a headline. And I think that's all they are really saying.

    In my humble opinion most households still don't manage their energy use nearly as well as they should.

    And what about the 1 household in 10 which, we can only assume, makes no attempt to manage energy consumption at all?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeNov 23rd 2012
     
    Sneaked out and read the neighbour's meters again, been 14 days since I last did it (had my bill today and had to go out as it was over estimated by about 20%)

    So

    House A 452 (end terrace, 2 adults, 1 small child)
    House B 192 (mid terrace, 2 adults)
    House C 276 (mid terrace, 2 adults)

    The day/night breakdowns is:

    House A 149(day) 303(night)
    House B 58 (day) 134(night)
    House C 108 (day) 169 (night)

    So our average usage is 306.6 or 21.9 kWh.day^-1
    Average day usage is 105 or 7.5 kWh.day^-1
    Average night usage 202 or 14.4 kWh.day^-1

    So looks like House C does not have their heating on, or they have an electric shower as we are similar on the night rate.
    House A has heating on and I have never seen them use a washing line, so probably using a tumble dryer a lot.

    As an aside, my Current Cost meter (with a couple of estimates in there) says I have used 177 kWh over the same period, so about 8% down on my real usage. May check my voltage over the next few days and see if it is high or low compared to the set point of 230V.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2012 edited
     
    Been sneaking around again and getting enough to start charting it.
    Seems mine is creeping up a bit. Better keep an eye on that:

    Pictures of what is going on in my street.
    • CommentAuthorTriassic
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012
     
    Maybe House A like to keep their indoor plants warm ;)
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012
     
    End of terrace and a small child, never seen washing on a line either.
    More concerned why mine is creeping up though.
    • CommentAuthorRobinB
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012
     
    It's getting colder?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012
     
    Yes it is, but as I am on E7 the night load is basically fixed. I may have done more washing (run that at about 2pm when I do) and I use a fan heater in the mornings (usually before 7).
    Most likely is getting complacent (or my neighbours in House C have been away, not seen them much).
  2.  
    Hi,
    Do you use storerage heaters on economy 7 ? If you do then the heater is "filled up" one night and used the next day. If you have a cold day, then that night maybe a full charge is required. On a warmer day if you only use half the stored heat on that night you would only need to store half the amount of energy/heat. So overall the electricity used would approximately follow the outside temperature variations.

    Richard
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012
     
    Hi Richard
    I was hoping that was the case, but seems it is not so. Partly because the heater is set on a thermostat (though not sure how effective it is), partly because it has been 'de-rated', I took two elements out and mainly I think because when it is warmer outside my house just gets warmer inside.
    I have very detailed usage data that I will unpick sometime soon, but is could be that we have been using more hot water and the header tank is in the loft, so that will be colder than in the autumn.
    Unpicking what is happening is the tricky bit but the interesting bit.:bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthorSeret
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012
     
    I think you might need finer-grained temperature data than just the average. A weekly temperature average is a very blunt tool when you're breaking consumption down into half-daily units.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012 edited
     
    Yes, I have all that as well.
    I know that some weeks I run the washing machine more than others. Last week was a heavy week, so this week will be a light week. Actually not me, my lodger, she seems to work on a ten day cycle (when I remind her a couple of times). At about 1.25 kWh a load it can make a difference. Also been in typing a lot, so had the fan heater on more than usual.
    Think this week I am going to be in a lot as just been mugged for £170 by the Optician, and I have 20/35 vision, if there is such a thing.
    • CommentAuthorskyewright
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012
     
    Posted By: SteamyTeaHi Richard
    Partly because the heater is set on a thermostat (though not sure how effective it is),

    I think it's pretty effective at limiting the temperature inside the casing, which is what its job is.


    partly because it has been 'de-rated', I took two elements out

    Fair enough. That will make it more likely that it needs to be on throughout the charge cycle (as it's trying to warm 3 times the intended mass (I'm assuming there were 3 element to start with).

    and mainly I think because when it is warmer outside my house just gets warmer inside.

    But what happens when it goes from cold to colder?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2012 edited
     
    Posted By: skyewrightI think it's pretty effective at limiting the temperature inside the casing, which is what its job is.
    Yes it does seem to do that, along with the de-rating.

    Posted By: skyewright(I'm assuming there were 3 element to start with)
    4, 750W elements, now two in the middle. In the past the air used to exit at over 85°C (fried an iButton checking it), seems closer to 70°C now, but not actually checked it. Something to do.

    Posted By: skyewrightBut what happens when it goes from cold to colder?
    This is Cornwall, hardly happens (unless you read the Telegraph about Shelterbox: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/telegraphchristmasappeal/9743022/Telegraph-Christmas-Charity-Appeal-Undercover-with-the-ShelterBox-mercy-missionaries.html), I just turn a fan heater on for longer.

    I only use the one storage heater but 'live' in the kitchen where I use a fan heater when needed. Often not really needed, but when you sit and type for 4 hours without moving you get chilly even when it is 22°C, well I do)
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2013 edited
     
    Had rather forgotten about this, been six months (and 2 days) since I last looked, but the numbers are revealing.

    House A has used a total of 3624 kWh, 1581 kWh on the day rate and 2043 kWh on the night rate, a 44/56 split
    House B has used a total of 2048 kWh, 573 kWh on the day rate and 1475 kWh on the night rate, a 28/72 split
    House C has used a total of 2609 kWh, 1564 kWh on the day rate and 1045 kWh on the night rate, a 60/40 split

    In cash terms that works out as (at 0.17 and 0.65 p/kWh unit price only):
    House A £400
    House B £193
    House C £334

    Using an overall p/kWh figure it is this:
    House A 11p/kWH
    House B 9.4 p/kWh
    House C 12.8 p/kWh

    Just as a reminder:
    House A is the end of terrace (so greater heat loss), 1 small child, two adults, one working.
    House B (me), 2 adults, work from home.
    House C, 2 adults, both working, one in all afternoon
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2014
     
    Had another look at the meters today and I am feeling pretty smug.

    House A has used a total of 478 kWh, split 161 kWh (day) and 317 kWh (night)
    House B has used a total of 293 kWh, split 46 kWh (day) and 247 kWh (night)
    House C has used a total of 346 kWh, Split 135 kWh (day) and 211 kWh (night)

    So that is a mean daily usage of:
    House A, 34 kWh
    House B, 21 kWh
    House C, 25 kWh

    Close to my goal of not using more than 20 kWh/day
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteamyTea
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2014
     
    Was time to have another look, especially as the people in House C have just moved out. Be interesting to see what the new tenets use.


    House A has used a total of 967 kWh, split 324 kWh (day) and 633 kWh (night)
    House B has used a total of 663 kWh, split 180 kWh (day) and 483 kWh (night)
    House C has used a total of 683 kWh, Split 299 kWh (day) and 384 kWh (night)

    So that is a mean daily usage of:
    House A, 27 kWh
    House B, 18 kWh
    House C, 19 kWh

    So managed my goal of being under 20 kWh/day during the coldest time of year. And has one of my neighbours.
   
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