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Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

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    • CommentAuthorgfletcher
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2021
     
    Hi All,
    It is time to look at finding someone to paint my windows for me, I have heard good things about Linseed Oil Paint.
    Two questions please -
    1. I have Russell Timbertech softwood windows, apparently the timber is treated before manufacture - would that make a difference to what paint products I can use?
    2. I am in Leicester - does anyone know any good painters who are used to these products? I tried my local painter and he isn't willing to use it.

    Cheers,
    Gavin
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2021
     
    As someone who specifies Russell Timbertech windows, I'm curious to know how, in what way, they need refinishing - what's happened to their factory finish, and over what timespan?
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2021 edited
     
    +1 for Tom's question. I'd suggest calling Russell Timbertech and asking them for details of the paint system they use, and what products can be used to overpaint it if required.

    "Russell Timber Technology sources a clear and pigmented coating system developed in Scandinavia by an international team of specialist chemists which has performed in the harsh climatic conditions of Norway & Sweden for over 30 years."
    •  
      CommentAuthornigel
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2021
     
    It's probably Teknos Aquatop, it comes up in their specs if you search , it should last at least 10 years in normal conditions and I would repaint with the same.
    • CommentAuthorvord
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2021 edited
     
    Linseed paint is lovely. It doesn't crack or peel, just dusts. Much less prep repainting in a few years than modern paints. Can go on anything. If it is painted over a paint that will crack and peel it'll take the linseed off with it when it does that. Drying times are long and the Linseed paint season is only a couple hot months in the summer.
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTime7 days ago edited
     
    1 - If the windows were new, I guess that there may be a concern that solvents in the treatment might interact with the paint. As the windows aren't new this may not be a factor. It would be interesting to know the view of your intended paint manufacturer on this. You would want to be stripping them back, with a heat gun, to the timber.

    2 - Maybe you can ask the supplier who they've sold to in your area?
    • CommentAuthorgfletcher
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Thanks all for your comments, the windows have been in for 8 years with a stain finish so it has a shorter 'life span'. The sills are 'peeling' or flaking a bit - so the substance used is an odd one. The windows are ok - the more exposed windows are flaking around the joints. The painter who wouldn't use linseed said that the timber is all fine, it just needs re painting. I suppose I am just thinking that using something that will nourish the wood and need less maintenance would be attractive! But maybe I just need to look at using the same product.
    But I want someone who knows what they are doing! Any help or guidance gratefully received!
    Cheers,
    Gavin
    •  
      CommentAuthorfostertom
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    What stain was it - a 'clear', or 'opaque coloured', like paint? The latter should have done v much better than you describe; a tinted 'clear' a few years' better, but if it was colourless 'clear' then that's about what's expected. Colourless clear is very attractive but the manufs advise against and put disclaimers on.
    • CommentAuthorvord
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Linseed paint can vary in mould resistance etc. I've always used Ingleby paints. No probs but the paint does dust quickly after the first couple coats and is much more matt than gloss until the next repaint where it stays glossy for longer. Drying time during linseed paint season is a couple days. That's why nobody uses it.

    I've never tried linseed paint outdoors without pigment. For boiled linseed oil without UV protection the wood will grey. I don't know of any clear linseed paint with UK protection.

    The thing that swung me was removing linseed paint that had been overpainted with nasty cracking and peeling modern paints. The wood underneath was perfect and nice and oily. Up until the nasty modern stuff it would have been able to breathe too and evaporate excess moisture.

    For preparation on an old window I completely strip modern finishes. On some more modern windows that had modern finishes from new I've removed the peeling bits and sanded. On a couple of windows that's done a reasonable job but on one south facing window I got peeling again. On repeating the process a couple of years later it's doing better. That window is full of rot from the modern paints so doesn't have long for this life.
    • CommentAuthorgfletcher
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Hi Tom, it was the Light Oak stain. It has lasted (just) beyond the guarantee for the stain finish!

    So I wouldn't be looking at a clear linseed finish - but I also know that I am probably looking at more of a paint finish if I go with Linseed.

    I am looking for impartial advice because I know that people are generally less familiar with Linseed paints - so if I ask a painter they will tell me to go with what they know better.

    Thanks,
    Gavin
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    In addition to the above, maybe this long-term report (with photos) will be of interest : https://www.myhouseextension.com/wonderful-linseed-oil-paint-.html
    • CommentAuthoralexc
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    I second Mike 1 link. I have read a lot of links like that. The downside of linseed paint ( with linseed as solvent) is drying time. days not hours so risks of rain are high.

    The upsides are much more than mainstream plastic paints. Eg no primer neede and what's written above.
    I have painted 8 house with traditional paints, they trap water in. Leading to problems, I spend a lot of time fixing these problems.. And I am pretty sure Alkyd/ plastic paints don't really last or lend themselves to maintenance.
    Other options exist for clear finishes tho.
    You can buy clear waxes/oils to provide a good finish. Before applying that layer apply a wood lifetime extending product. Example
    https://www.hout-olie.nl/contents/nl/d530_Nano-Pantser.html
    In Dutch, it should give 25 years protection. I have it ready to try out. Not used. They sell another product you can mix into other oil based products. Testing that at moment.

    Back to paint
    You could also look at Keim lignosol, Keim paints use mineral chemical interaction to bond with what they are painted on. Not tried these.
    Could carry on ... :bigsmile:
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