Home  5  Books  5  GBEzine  5  News  5  HelpDesk  5  Register  5  GreenBuilding.co.uk
Not signed in (Sign In)

Categories



Green Building Bible, Fourth Edition
Green Building Bible, fourth edition (both books)
These two books are the perfect starting place to help you get to grips with one of the most vitally important aspects of our society - our homes and living environment.

PLEASE NOTE: A download link for Volume 1 will be sent to you by email and Volume 2 will be sent to you by post as a book.

Buy individually or both books together. Delivery is free!


powered by Surfing Waves




Vanilla 1.0.3 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

Welcome to new Forum Visitors
Join the forum now and benefit from discussions with thousands of other green building fans and discounts on Green Building Press publications: Apply now.




  1.  
    Hi - Wool insulation is made using Thorlan IW as a moth repellant - which seems to be the replacement for Borax. Does anyone have any information about recycling sheep wool insulation at the end of its life?

    A quick look at Thorlan IW shows it is Potassium Fluoro Titatinate. The data sheet looks pretty awful.

    I keep sheep and I get that using wool as insulation is recycling something natural, however as the Thorlan IW chemical is 1% of the wool insulation, and the insulation itself is 5-20% polyester adhesive, is sheep wool insulation really a fully recyclable product at the end of its life?

    Also does anyone have any information about Potassium Fluoro Titatinate and bees?

    Thanks!
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTimeJun 13th 2019
     
    Posted By: treeplanterI keep sheep and I get that using wool as insulation is recycling something natural, however as the Thorlan IW chemical is 1% of the wool insulation, and the insulation itself is 5-20% polyester adhesive, is sheep wool insulation really a fully recyclable product at the end of its life?

    Moth and wrinkle resistant jumpers? https://www.loveknitting.com/yarn-guide-link
  2.  
    Hey! That sounds good!

    I wear loads of jumpers and I am getting quite old. Do you think a wrinkle-resistant jumper could help me?

    :bigsmile:
    • CommentAuthormarktime
    • CommentTimeJun 13th 2019
     
    I'm getting on too so I'd be happy with a wrinkle-free face but I'm not sure that Thorlan IW would help me. More's the pity! :sad:
    • CommentAuthortony
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2019
     
    there are plenty of places for bees to nest that do not include in insulation, I have never seen bees nesting in insulation.
  3.  
    Posted By: tonythere are plenty of places for bees to nest that do not include in insulation, I have never seen bees nesting in insulation.


    We had a bumblebee nest in the glass fibre insulation in the ceiling above the kitchen in our old bungalow. Our neighbours had a bumblebee nest in the insulation in their wall cavity.
    •  
      CommentAuthordjh
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2019
     
    Bees are fairly large as insects go, so insect netting should keep them out. The problem with moths and sheeps wool is that they eat it, not just nest in it. The protectants are designed to protect against creatures eating it, not just touching it, I think. I know of one place that was insulated using untreated wool and where they didn't seal all the openings ...
  4.  
    I wondered if it still counts as a green product if it can't be recycled when the building is taken down?
    • CommentAuthorMike1
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2019 edited
     
    'Green' is a spectrum without an agreed universal scoring mechanism. There's a balance between the source of the material and whether it's grown or sourced for that specific purpose and at what environmental cost / whether it makes use of a by-product that would otherwise be put to some lesser use / is a recycled product that would otherwise be put to some lesser use, the energy embodied in its production & transport, chemicals added for fire / insect resistance, the waste from its installation & how that it recovered and disposed of, the energy saved when it's in use (taking into account the quality of installation and any decline in performance over its lifetime), the practicality and environmental costs of reusing / upcycling / recycling at the end of use, etc.

    But if everyone decided to use wool insulation I imagine it wouldn't be very green; we'd probably end up with a big increase in sheep farming, with an associated increase in methane - and consequently global warming - and a glut of mutton. If there's a surplus of wool on the market right now then that's one point in favour of you choosing it for insulation. My personal preference is to use insulation made from recycled plastic, when feasible; others prefer cellulose - but both could be used for other purposes - new bottles or new cardboard. Of course mineral wool also uses a natural product - rock - though it takes more embodied energy to transform it into insulation. It's not a simple calculation.
Add your comments

    Username Password
  • Format comments as
 
   
The Ecobuilding Buzz
Site Map    |   Home    |   View Cart    |   Pressroom   |   Business   |   Links   
Logout    

© Green Building Press